Pamela

Front Cover
Penguin Books Limited, 1985 - Fiction - 537 pages
11 Reviews

'I cannot be patient, I cannot be passive, when my virtue is in danger'

Fifteen-year-old Pamela Andrews, alone and unprotected, is relentlessly pursued by her dead mistress's son. Although she is attracted to young Mr B., she holds out against his demands and threats of abduction and rape, determined to defend her virginity and abide by her own moral standards. Psychologically acute in its investigations of sex, freedom and power, Richardson's first novel caused a sensation when it was first published, with its depiction of a servant heroine who dares to assert herself. Richly comic and full of lively scenes and descriptions, Pamela contains a diverse cast of characters, ranging from the vulgar and malevolent Mrs Jewkes to the aggressive but awkward country squire who serves this unusual love story as both its villain and its hero.

This edition incorporates all the revisions made by Richardson in his lifetime. Margaret A. Doody's introduction discusses the genre of epistolary novels, and examines characterization, the role of women and class differences inPamela.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Lukerik - LibraryThing

If you're into BDSM you're going to love this novel. If your urges don't run that way then you'll probably not 'get' it. I loved it. Richardson re-wrote it three times in an attempt to make it less ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - penelopemarzec - LibraryThing

I read this book because it was a bestseller after it was published in 1740. I read it because it was the first novel of its kind. As a romance writer, I was curious about it. As a writer of ... Read full review

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About the author (1985)

Samuel Richardson (1689-1761) was born in Derbyshire, the son of a joiner. He received little formal education and in 1706 was apprenticed to a printer in London. Thirteen years later he set himself up as a stationer and printer and became of the leading figures in the trade. He printed political material, newspapers and literature. He began writing Pamela as a result of a suggestion from friends that he should compile a book of model letters for use by unskilled writers. Pamela was a great success and went on to write Clarissa, one of the masterpieces of European literature. 

Margaret Anne Doody is a professor of Literature at the University of Notre Dame and has published widely on in literary criticism.

Bibliographic information