Panama: The Creation, Destruction, and Resurrection

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McBride, Nast, 1914 - Panama Canal (Panama) - 568 pages
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Page 285 - The government of New Granada guarantees to the government of the United States that the right of way or transit across the .Isthmus of Panama, upon any modes of communication that now exist or that may be hereafter constructed, shall be open and free to the government and citizens of the United States...
Page 513 - The canal shall be free and open to the vessels of commerce and of war of all nations observing these Rules, on terms of entire equality...
Page 505 - The Republic of Panama further grants to the United States in perpetuity the use, occupation and control...
Page 505 - ... to the entire exclusion of the exercise by the Republic of Panama of any such sovereign rights, power or authority.
Page 285 - And, in order to secure to themselves the tranquil and constant enjoyment of these advantages, and as an especial compensation for the said advantages and for the favors they have acquired by the 4th, 5th and 6th articles of this Treaty, the United States guarantee positively and efficaciously to New Granada...
Page 362 - declare martial law; and, by virtue of vested constitutional authority, when public order is disturbed, [would] approve by decree the ratification of the canal treaty as signed ; or, if the Government of the United States prefers, [would] call extra session of the Congress — with new and friendly members — next May to approve the treaty.
Page 505 - The Canal, when constructed, and the entrances thereto shall be neutral in perpetuity, and shall be opened upon the terms provided for by Section I of Article three of, and in conformity with all the stipulations of, the treaty entered into by the Governments of the United States and Great Britain on November 18, 1901.
Page 506 - The Suez Maritime Canal shall always be free and open, in time of war as in time of peace, to every vessel of commerce or of war, without distinction of flag.
Page 529 - If it should become necessary at any time to employ armed forces for the safety or protection of the Canal, or of the ships that make use of the same, or the railways and auxiliary works, the United States shall have the right, at all times and in its discretion, to use its police and its land and naval forces or to establish fortifications for these purposes.
Page 350 - Panama have, by apparently unanimous movement, dissolved their political connection with the Republic of Colombia and resumed their independence. When you are satisfied that a de facto government, republican in form and without substantial opposition from its own people, has been established in the State of Panama, you will enter into relations with it as the responsible government of the territory and look to it for all due action to protect...

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