Panther in the Basement

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Harcourt Brace, 1997 - Fiction - 147 pages
2 Reviews
Oz revisits here the Jerusalem of his childhood in the last days of the British mandate in Palestine. Our hero's name is Proffy (short for Professor), and he is twelve years old, his head filled with dreams of dying heroically in battle. Together with his friends Ben Hur and Chita, he spends the summer of 1947 as a member of a make-believe underground movement fighting the British. Indoctrinated by his patriotic father and his zealous Bible teacher, Proffy becomes "an excited panther in the basement, seething with oaths and vows, knowing exactly...to what he will dedicate his life, for what he will sacrifice it when the moment of truth comes". But when his comrades accuse him of treason for his friendship with Sergeant Dunlop - a fat, good-natured British soldier who revels in the Bible and shares with him the love of language - Proffy must vindicate himself in the eyes of his family and friends.

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User Review  - SqueakyChu - LibraryThing

Proffy is a 12-year-old Jewish child in British-occupied Palestine before the establishment of the state of Israel. When his two friends, Ben Hur and Chita, find out that he’s been keeping company ... Read full review

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User Review  - schatzi - LibraryThing

This is an interesting story about a young boy living in Jerusalem who "befriends" a soldier, part of the British occupying force before Israel became a recognized country. I put befriends in ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
3
Section 3
9
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Amos Oz was born in Jerusalem in 1939. He is the author of fourteen novels and collections of short fiction, and numerous works of nonfiction. His acclaimed memoir A Tale of Love and Darkness was an international bestseller and recipient of the prestigious Goethe prize, as well as the National Jewish Book Award. Scenes from Village Life, a New York Times Notable Book, was awarded the Prix Méditerranée Étranger in 2010. He lives in Tel Aviv, Israel.

About the Author:
Nicholas de Lange is a rabbi and Lecturer in Rabbinics at the University of Cambridge. In addition, he has translated the works of Amos Oz and has written several books on Jewish literature.

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