Paper Airplane: A Lesson for Flying Outside the Box

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Simon and Schuster, Apr 6, 2004 - Self-Help - 72 pages
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An inspiring story of one boy's courage to be different

Mrs. Hackett has spent the past week teaching her sixth-grade class about aerodynamics. To complete the lesson, she organizes a paper airplane contest. Tim asks Jeff to be his partner, because even though some people consider Jeff a dreamer, Tim likes how Jeff isn't afraid to be different.

After spending fifteen minutes at their desks, carefully folding intricate paper airplanes, the class goes outside with Mrs. Hackett. Tim begins to worry, though, because Jeff is still holding an unfolded piece of paper. The kids line up one at a time, and Tim watches as the airplanes sail through the air, some traveling far, some falling quickly. Still, Jeff doesn't fold his paper. The team runs out of time, and Jeff tells Tim to go ahead and fly his plane. When there's no more time to stall, Jeff steps up to the line and does something that surprises everybody and that nobody in Mrs. Hackett's class will ever forget.

"Paper Airplane" is an inspirational book that teaches a valuable lesson for people of all ages. All breakthroughs, be they in science, literature, business, technology, or some other field, occurred because instead of following the rules that have been around for years, one individual dared to create his own rules. Tim and Jeff's story is a reminder that thinking outside the box can be a risk, but the potential reward can be worth it.

 

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Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Michael McMillan is an instructor of Computer Information Systems at Pulaski Technical College in North Little Rock, AR. He is also an adjunct instructor of Information Science at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Before moving to academia, he was a programmer/analyst for Arkansas Children's Hospital, where he worked in statistical computing and data analysis.

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