Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17

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Page 231 - Texas, by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings or by the powers vested in the marshals...
Page 220 - My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or destroy slavery.
Page 349 - Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him: The evil that men do lives after them, The good is oft interred with their bones; So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious; If it were so, it was a grievous fault, And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it. Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest (For Brutus is an honourable man, So are they all, all honourable men) Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
Page 231 - Now, therefore, I, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States, in virtue of the power in me vested by the Constitution and the laws, have thought fit to call forth, and...
Page 220 - I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it; and if I could do it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that. What I do about slavery and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union.
Page 376 - You will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed, and I earnestly pray that a merciful God will extend to you His blessing and protection. With an increasing admiration of your constancy and devotion to your country, and a grateful remembrance of your kind and generous consideration of myself, I bid you an affectionate farewell. RE LEE, General.
Page 359 - The statesman-warrior, moderate, resolute, Whole in himself, a common good. Mourn for the man of amplest influence, Yet clearest of ambitious crime, Our greatest yet with least pretence, Great in council and great in war, Foremost captain of his time, Rich in saving common sense, And, as the greatest only are, In his simplicity sublime.
Page 434 - Provided always that no regulations made or to be made by Congress shall tend to emancipate Slaves.
Page 115 - That a Committee of two on the part of the Senate, and three on the part of the...
Page 438 - States declares that congress shall have power to dispose of, and make all needful rules and regulations respecting, the territory and other property belonging to the United States.

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