Papers and Proceedings of the ... General Meeting of the American Library Association Held at ..., Volume 10

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Page 80 - One is sometimes asked by young people to recommend a course of reading. My advice would be that they should confine themselves to the supreme books in whatever literature, or still better to choose some one great author, and make themselves thoroughly familiar with him.
Page 132 - American library association hereby expresses its high appreciation of the action of the regents of the, University of the State of New York, In continuing the school of library economy; and with a desire to aid in securing the greatest efficiency of the school, the library association appoints a committee of three as a committee of correspondence with the authorities of the school. Said committee is hereby instructed to inquire in what way they can be of service in promoting the objects for which...
Page 46 - ... shall cause to be submitted to the legal voters of such city, at the first city election thereafter, or, if the petition so requests, at a special election to be called for that purpose, the question of the establishment and maintenance of a free public library and reading room by such city...
Page 122 - Congressional record (bound), ' statutes-at-large,' and of every ether government publication, not already supplied for this purpose, printed at the government printing-office, including the publications of all bureaus and offices of the government, excepting bills, resolutions, documents printed for the special use of committees of congress, and circulars designed not for communicating information to the public, but for use within the several executive departments and offices of the government,...
Page 2 - CONFERENCE. side by side with the concrete sidewalk and the electric tramcar. Yet there is much still to desire. If common sense is not uncommon in ordinary life, no more is blundering, because mankind mix with their judgment so much unreason from passion, from fashion, from prejudice, from thoughtlessness, from laziness, from habit. Even the most practical people fall into most irrational acts. As I came here I saw a country house on a lake bank, where there was a lovely view. A barn was planted...
Page 141 - I move that a special committee of five be appointed by the chair to report at least three months before the next meeting a revised form of constitution and by-laws covering all these points.
Page 69 - THE LIBRARY IN ITS RELATIONS TO PERSONS ENGAGED IN IN" DUSTRIAL PURSUITS. BY SAMUEL SWETT GREEN, LIBRARIAN OF THE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, WORCESTER, MASS. Л Т the meeting of this association which was held at Lake George, a report was made on the School of Library Economy, which it was then proposed to establish, and which has now been in existence for three years, in which the writer, addressing the librarians present at the conference, said: " We shall most of us agree, probably, that the most important...
Page 34 - ... served than is necessitated by church services. But our new view of the purpose of Sunday throws new light on this fact. The question to be asked is, Will the step proposed, conduce to the real elevation of the community ? Since, then, by the labor of a few, the majority can be helped to the right and legitimate use of Sunday, our first objection falls to the ground.
Page 9 - President has reminded us that any ^"^ discussion of a subject should begin with definition. What, then, do I mean by "superstitions?" I find the dictionaries too strict in their definitions, the word being confined by them almost wholly to religious applications. I must, therefore, make a definition for myself ; and I will ask you to let me call a superstition any idea or notion which is held as a matter of belief, and which is based on authority and accepted without reason, or the application to...
Page 31 - Assembly, absence from church was visited with a night's imprisonment and a week's slavery; for the second offense, a month's slavery, and for the third, a year and a day. (See Cooke, John Esten. Virginia, 1883, p. 112.) Passing by the severity of those early days and coming down to the New England Sunday two or three generations ago, we find the same idea in a milder and more attractive form. Perhaps some of us have spent a Sabbath in one of those old New England towns where the modern spirit of...

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