Papers of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Volume 1

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Page 109 - But these provincial synods do not appear, as a constant and regular institution, fixed to definite times, until about the end of the second or the beginning of the third century...
Page 51 - Deity Caesar Augustus, and by the pure Virgin whom our fathers worshipped, that we will be faithful to Gaius Caesar Augustus and all his house, and that we will consider those our friends whom he shall prefer, and those our enemies whom he shall declare. May it be well with us if we are true to our oaths. and may it be otherwise if we are false to them. These offered themselves as ambassadors at their own expense...
Page 196 - Itaque circiter annis quadringentis 4 post Antiochus rex, cum in id opus inpensam esset pollicitus, cellae magnitudinem et columnarum circa dipteron conlocationem epistyliorumque et ceterorum ornamentorum ad symmetriam distributionem magna sollertia scientiaque summa civis Romanus Quossutius & nobiliter est architectatus.
Page 199 - Reges amici atque socii et singuli in suo quisque regno Caesareas urbes condiderunt et cuncti simul aedem lovis Olympii Athenis antiquitus incohatam perficere communi sumptu destinaverunt Genioque eius dedicare...
Page 240 - ... battle in the two passages last mentioned, in the very face of the Persian fleet hardly half a mile distant? It is here a most important point, that our eye-witness, Aeschylus, distinctly implies that it was only after the Greeks had rowed forward some distance from their first position that they were seen by the Persians.1 Themistocles, we are informed, harangued the Greek crews on the shore of Salamis after daybreak, when (on the common theory) the enemy's fleet must have been in plain sight...
Page 187 - The Athenians relate, that after it was thrown down, the three others nearest to it were heard to lament the loss of their sister ! and these nocturnal lamentations did not cease till the sacrilegious voivode was destroyed by poison." Two of the columns, connected by one immense slab, are surmounted by a small building, now in ruins, but once the hermitage of a Greek monk. Here he passed his life, seventy feet in the air, sustained by two of the most graceful columns of Greece.
Page 201 - Africanis adtribuit. nec quisquam 6 5 fere principum tantum terrarum tam celeriter peragravit. denique cum post Africam Romam redisset, statim ad orientem profectus per Athenas iter fecit atque opera, quae apud Athenienses coeperat, dedicavit, ut lovis Olympii aedem et aram sibi, eodemque modo per 7 6 Asiam iter faciens templa sui nominis consecravit.
Page 244 - Salamis, where their fleet was lying. The King at once orders the officers of his fleet to make two movements to shut up the Greeks within the bay, so that escape shall be impossible. When night shall come, they are first to "station a squadron of ships in three lines, to guard the exits and the rushing straits of the sea" (ie the southern outlets of the straits of Salamis), and secondly to station "others round about the island of Ajax."1 He threatens that, if the Greeks escape this blockade and...
Page 239 - ... feet. Can we now believe that the Greek fleet was allowed to form quietly in line of battle in the two passages last mentioned, in the very face of the Persian fleet hardly half a mile distant? It is here a most important point, that our eye-witness, Aeschylus, distinctly implies that it was only after the Greeks had rowed forward some distance from their first position that they were seen by the Persians.1 Themistocles, we are informed, harangued the Greek crews...

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