Papers of the New Haven Colony Historical Society, Volume 9

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The Society, 1918 - Connecticut
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Page 313 - However superior to me in general knowledge and experience the respectable body of this house may be, yet I claim to know more of America than most of you, having seen and been conversant in that country. The people, I believe, are as truly loyal as any subjects the king has ; but a people jealous of their liberties, and who will vindicate them, if ever they should be violated. But the subject is too delicate ; I will say no more.
Page 183 - They planted by your care ! No, your oppressions planted them in America. They fled from your tyranny to a then uncultivated and inhospitable country, where they exposed themselves to almost all the hardships to which human nature is liable; and among others, to the cruelties of a savage foe, the most subtle, and I will take upon me to say, the most formidable of any people upon the face of...
Page 171 - King of England, and adopted by the People of this State, Shall be and remain the Civil Constitution of this State, under the Sole authority of the People thereof, independent of any King or Prince...
Page 7 - The proposition would be welcomed in Connecticut; and could we doubt of New Hampshire? But New York must be associated: and how is her concurrence to be obtained? She must be made the centre of the confederacy. Vermont and New Jersey would follow of course, and Rhode Island of necessity.
Page 313 - I this day told you so, that same spirit of freedom which actuated that people at first will accompany them still; but prudence forbids me to explain myself further.
Page 3 - But ambitious encroachments of the federal government, on the authority of the state governments, would not excite the opposition of a single state, or of a few states only. They would be signals of general alarm. Every government would espouse the common cause. A correspondence would be opened. Plans of resistance would be concerted.
Page 312 - And now will these Americans, children planted by our care, nourished up by our indulgence until they are grown to a degree of strength and opulence, and protected by our arms, will they grudge to contribute their mite to relieve us from the heavy weight of that burden which we lie under ?" Colonel Barre arose, and, echoing Townshend's words, thus commented :
Page 9 - I will here express but one sentiment, which is, that dismemberment of our empire will be a clear sacrifice of great positive advantages without any counterbalancing good, administering no relief to our real disease, which is democracy, the poison of which by a subdivision will only be the more concentrated in each part, and consequently the more virulent.
Page 277 - The cities were well built and full of inhabitants, the markets rilled with plenty, the people well favoured and well clothed, the fields well tilled, the cattle fat and strong, the fences, houses, and windows all in repair, and no Old Tenor anywhere in the country; which would almost make one suspect that the Deity is not so angry at that offence as a New England Justice.
Page 312 - They planted by your care ! — No, your oppressions planted them in America ! They fled from your tyranny to a then uncultivated and inhospitable country, where they exposed themselves to almost all the hardships to which human nature is liable ; and, among others, to the cruelties of a savage foe the most subtle, and I will take upon me to say the most formidable, of any People upon...

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