Parables from Nature: 1st - 4th Series, Volume 2

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Bell and Daldy, 1866 - Fables
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Page 162 - Oh ! may we keep and ponder in our mind God's wondrous love in saving lost mankind...
Page 161 - I bring you glad tidings of great joy" [Six los. /CHRISTIANS, awake, salute the happy morn, Whereon the Saviour of mankind was born ; Rise to adore the mystery of love, Which hosts of angels chanted from above ; With them the joyful tidings first begun Of God incarnate and the Virgin's Son.
Page 153 - ... were dropping like starrays on their home, reflected hither and thither from the sun that shone above. Oh ! if they could but have known ! Beautiful forest pond, crowded with mysterious life, of whose secrets we know so little, who would not willingly linger by your banks for study and for thought? There, where the beech-tree throws out her graceful arms, glorying in the loveliness that is reflected beneath. There, where in the nominal silence the innocent birds pour out their music of joy. There,...
Page 103 - It appears not," ejaculated the Woodlark, as gravely as possible, and with another sigh ; whereat the Robin's eye actually twinkled with mirth, for he had a good deal of fun in his composition, and could not but smile to himself at the Woodlark's solemn way of admitting that he was alive. " Nor the winter before?" asked he. " No," murmured the Woodlark again. "Nor the winter before that? "persisted the saucy Robin. " Well, no ; of course not," answered the Woodlark, somewhat impatiently, "because...
Page 139 - That were possible, always provided your account can be depended upon," mused the Grub with a doubtful air. " Little fellow," exclaimed the Frog, "remember that your distrust cannot injure me, but may deprive yourself of a comfort." " And you really think, then, that the glorious creature you describe was once a " " Silence," cried the Frog ; " I am not prepared with definitions. Adieu ! the shades of night are falling on your world. I return to my grassy home on dry land. Go to rest, little fellow,...
Page 104 - Woodlark, as gravely as possible, and with another sigh ; whereat the Robin's eye actually twinkled with mirth, for he had a good deal of fun in his composition, and could not but smile to himself at the Woodlark's solemn way of admitting that he was alive. " Nor the winter before ? " asked he. " No," murmured the Woodlark again. " Nor the winter before that ? " persisted the saucy Robin. " Well, no ; of course not," answered the Woodlark, somewhat impatiently, " because I am here, as you see.
Page 141 - That was the strong sensation which mastered every other, and to it he felt he must submit, as to some inevitable law. And then he thought of the Frog's account, and felt a trembling conviction that the time had come when the riddle of his own fate must be solved. His friends and relations were gathered around him, some of his own age, some a generation younger, who had only that year entered upon existence. All of them were followers and adherents, whom he had inspired with his own enthusiastic...
Page 95 - I shall suppose it won't, and so I shall be happy still." " But I say it may happen," shouted the Tortoise. " And I ask will it ? " rejoined the Robin, in quite as determined a manner. " Which you know I cannot answer,
Page 159 - what?' my little Undine?" asked mamma: "what are they?" Undine glanced at her mother, and then at the motes, and then she said, " Stars ; " — but there was a misgiving look on her face as she spoke. " No, they're not stars, — are they, Mamma ? " observed the wiser Kate : " they're nothing but dust ;" — and the box danced about quicker than ever.
Page 120 - ... and hay, formed almost too warm a roosting-place for his hardy little frame. But even to the Tortoise he could never tell all he had felt during that wonderful winter ; for he could never explain to any one the mysterious friendship which grew up between himself and his protectors. He could never describe properly the friendly faces that sat round the breakfast-table on which at last he was allowed to hop about at will. He told, however, how he used to sing on the rose-tree outside, every morning...

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