Paradise Lost and Regained: With the Latin and Other Poems of John Milton

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H. Washbourne, 1810
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Page 102 - These abilities, wheresoever they be found, are the inspired gift of God, rarely bestowed, but yet to some (though most abuse) in every nation : and are of power, beside the office of a pulpit, to inbreed and cherish in a great people the seeds of virtue and public civility, to allay the perturbations of the mind, and set the affections in right tune...
Page 100 - Time serves not now, and perhaps I might seem too profuse to give any certain account of what the mind at home, in the spacious circuits of her musing, hath liberty to propose to herself, though of highest hope and hardest attempting; whether that epic form whereof the two poems of Homer, and those other two of Virgil and Tasso, are a diffuse, and that book of Job a brief model...
Page 124 - Which after held the sun and moon in fee. But this is got by casting pearl to hogs, That bawl for freedom in their senseless mood, And still revolt when Truth would set them free. Licence they mean when they cry Liberty; For who loves that must first be wise and good...
Page 80 - That, not to know at large of things remote From use, obscure and subtle; but, to know That which before us lies in daily life, Is the prime wisdom...
Page 52 - There it was that I found and visited the famous Galileo, grown old, a prisoner to the Inquisition for thinking in astronomy otherwise than the Franciscan and Dominican licensers thought.
Page 250 - The punishment of dissolute days ; in fine, Just or unjust, alike seem miserable, For oft alike both come to evil end. So deal not with this once thy glorious champion, The image of thy strength, and mighty minister, What do I beg ? how hast thou dealt already ? Behold him in this state calamitous, and turn His labours, for thou canst, to peaceful end.
Page 103 - Neither do I think it shame to covenant with any knowing reader that for some few years yet I may go on trust with him toward the payment of what I am now indebted...
Page 31 - That I to manhood am arrived so near; And inward ripeness doth much less appear, That some more timely-happy spirits endu'th.
Page 54 - Bembo, to fix all the industry and art I could unite to the adorning of my native tongue; not to make verbal curiosities the end (that were a toilsome vanity), but to be an interpreter and relater of the best and sagest things among mine own citizens throughout this island in the mother dialect...
Page 54 - ... that what the greatest and choicest wits of Athens, Rome, or modern Italy, and those Hebrews of old did for their country, I, in my proportion, with this over and above, of being a christian, might do for mine, not caring to be once named abroad, though perhaps I could attain to that, but content with these British islands as my world...

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