Parallel History: Being an Outline of the History and Biography of the World, Contemporaneously Arranged, Volume 2

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Whittaker, 1843 - World history
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Page 33 - My last and only request shall be, that myself may only bear the burden of your grace's displeasure, and that it may not touch the innocent souls of those poor gentlemen who, as I understand, are likewise in strait imprisonment for my sake. If ever I have found favour in your sight, if ever the name of Anne Boleyn hath been pleasing in your ears, then let me obtain this request...
Page 60 - I pray you Master Lieutenant, see me safe up, and for my coming down let me shift for myself.
Page 364 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Page 605 - It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal before it — draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer, and lift a ship of war like a bauble in the air. It can embroider muslin and forge anchors — cut steel into ribands, and impel loaded vessels against the fury of the winds and waves.
Page 118 - Taster gave to each of the guard a mouthful to eat, of the particular dish he had brought, for fear of any poison.
Page 117 - ... next came the Queen, in the sixty-fifth year of her age, as we were told, very majestic; her face oblong, fair but wrinkled; her eyes small, yet black and pleasant, her nose a little hooked; her lips narrow, and her teeth black (a defect the English seem subject to, from their too great use of sugar...
Page 117 - That Day she was dressed in white Silk, bordered with Pearls of the Size of Beans, and over it a Mantle of black Silk, shot with Silver Threads; her Train was very long, the End of it borne by a Marchioness; instead of a Chain, she had an oblong Collar of Gold and Jewels.
Page 79 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 239 - Lord ; and let all flesh give thanks unto his holy name for ever and ever. Psalm cxlvi. Lauda, anima mea. PRAISE the Lord, O my soul: while I live, will I praise the Lord; yea, as long as I have any being, I will sing praises unto my God. 2 O put not your trust in princes, nor in any child of man ; for there is
Page 118 - At the end of all this ceremonial a number of unmarried ladies appeared, who, with particular solemnity, lifted the meat off the table, and conveyed it into the queen's inner and more private chamber, where, after she had chosen for herself, the rest goes to the ladies of the court...

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