Parchment, Printing, and Hypermedia: Communication and World Order Transformation

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Columbia University Press, Aug 13, 2013 - History - 329 pages
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Interweaving media theory and historical analysis, this book explores the effect new digital-telecommunication technologies, which Deibert calls hypermedia, will have on the distribution of political power in the next century. Deibert tracks the transformation of Europe from the medieval to the modern and then turns to the hypermedia age, where new digital technologies such as the Internet, encryption, and high-resolution satellite imaging favor nonterritorial institutions and communities, shifting political authority and policymaking from individual nations to transnational corporations, global financial markets, and nongovernmental organizations and activists.
 

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Contents

Medium Theory Ecological Holism and the Study of World Order Transformation
17
Printing and the Medieval to Modern World Order Transformation
45
From the Parchment Codex to the Printing Press The Sacred Word and the Rise and Fall of Medieval Theocracy
47
Print and the Medieval to Modern World Order Transformation Distributional Changes
67
Print and the Medieval to Modern World Order Transformation Changes to Social Epistemology
94
Hypermedia and the Modern to Postmodern World Order Transformation
111
Transformation in the Mode of Communication The Emergence of the Hypermedia Environment
113
Hypermedia and the Modern to Postmodern World Order Transformation Distributional Changes
137
Hypermedia and the Modern to Postmodern World Order Transformation Changes to Social Epistemology
177
Conclusion
202
Notes
219
Index
315
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The Network Society
Darin Barney
Limited preview - 2004
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About the author (2013)

RONALD DEIBERT is professor of political science at the University of Toronto.

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