Parenting Girls

Front Cover

'The advice throughout this handbook is immensely practical. Keep it on the kitchen shelf and consult it as your daughter grows up.' - Dr Cherrill Hirst, Queensland University of Technology and Wesley Breast Cancer Clinic

The aim of this very practical handbook is to guide parents and the professionals who work with them in raising happy, well-adjusted girls. Contributors to the book have backgrounds in medicine, teaching and female health, and have firsthand experience of the joys and the problems of bringing up daughters. Parenting Girls first examines issues of infant development, toddler tantrums, sibling rivalry and bullying. It goes on to explore the complexities of teenage development, including anorexia and bulimia, body piercing and tattoos, divorce and single-parenting, the role of sex, the use of drugs and how to cope with teenage pregnancy.

In recognising the need for modern parents to be well-informed, Parenting Girls addresses the real challenges of bringing up a daughter in the twenty-first century. Readable and realistic, it is essential reading for parents and for professionals working with families.

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
6
Becoming a Person
22
The World Beyond
34
Copyright

18 other sections not shown

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About the author (2000)

Janet Irwin has worked in child psychiatry in Edinburgh and in the Student Health Service at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch. She was the director of the Student Health Service and is now Sexual Harrassment Conciliator, both at the University of Queensland. She has been awarded an Order of Australia for 'Services to Women and the Community'. Susanna de Vries has worked in a Family Therapy Clinic, written eight books and currently lectures part-time at the University of Queensland. She has been awarded a Churchill Fellowship and an Order of Australia. Susan Stratigos Wilson has worked in leading universities and research institutes and was on the staff of the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women. She is currently a Social Policy Analyst in women's issues. Between them, the contributors have successfully raised two dozen children.

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