Parenting Through Crisis: Helping Kids in Times of Loss, Grief, and Change

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Harper Collins, Jan 26, 2010 - Family & Relationships - 272 pages
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In this companion to her bestselling Kids are Worth It!, parenting educator Barbara Coloroso shows how parents can help children find a way through grief and sorrow during the difficult times of death, illness, divorce, and other upheavals. She offers concrete, compassionate ideas for supporting children as they navigate the emotional ups and downs that accompany loss, assisting them in developing their own constructive ways of responding to what life hands them.

At the heart of her approach is what she calls the T.A.0. of Family -- Time, Affection, and Optimism -- coupled with her deep understanding of how people move through grief. Barbara Coloroso's clear answers to difficult questions are enriched by uplifting humor and insightful anecdotes from her own experiences as a Franciscan nun, mother of three, and her thirty years as a parenting educator. With this Guide in hand, parents can feel assured that they are responding with wisdom and love when children need them most.

 

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Contents

Why This Book Why Now?
1
Essentials for the Journey Chapter 1Finding aPath Through Grief
9
The Big Ones
21
Death Helping Kids Mourn
23
When Illness Strikes
64
Families Changes and Challenges
103
Navigating Divorce
105
Families Born ofLoss and Hope
162
Responding to Crises Large and Small
217
Mistakes Mischief andMayhem
219
life Lessons
253
Index
257
Copyright

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Page 45 - Independence which gave liberty not alone to the people of this country, but hope to all the world, for all future time. It was that which gave promise that in due time the weights would be lifted from the shoulders of all men, and that all should have an equal chance.
Page 45 - It was not the mere matter of the separation of the colonies from the motherland, but that sentiment in the Declaration of Independence which gave liberty not alone to the people of this country, but hope to all the world, for all future time.
Page 73 - When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the ^ closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.
Page 16 - God, give us grace to accept with serenity the things that cannot be changed, courage to change the things which should be changed, and the wisdom to distinguish the one from the other.
Page 45 - Life of Washington." I remember all the accounts there given of the battlefields and struggles for the liberties of the country, and none fixed themselves upon my imagination so deeply as the struggle here at Trenton, New Jersey.
Page 44 - For there is no despair so absolute as that which comes with the first moments of our first great sorrow, when we have not yet known what it is to have suffered and be healed, to have despaired and to have recovered hope.
Page 45 - The crossing of the river; the contest with the Hessians; the great hardships endured at that time, all fixed themselves on my memory more than any single revolutionary event; and you all know, for you have all been boys, how these early impressions last longer than any others.
Page 25 - Small children have many more perceptions than they have terms to translate them; their vision is at any moment much richer, their apprehension even constantly stronger, than their prompt, their at all producible, vocabulary.

About the author (2010)

Barbara Coloroso is the author of the international bestseller Kids Are Worth It! and Parenting Through Crisis and is an acclaimed speaker on parenting, teaching, conflict, resolution, and grieving. Featured in Time, the New York Times, and on many radio and television shows, she lives with her husband in Littleton, Colorado.

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