Parents' Cultural Belief Systems: Their Origins, Expressions, and Consequences

Front Cover
Sara Harkness, Charles M. Super
Guilford Press, Jan 1, 1996 - Psychology - 558 pages
1 Review
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
This illuminating new volume offers a multifaceted view of parenting cultural belief systems - their origins in culturally constructed parental experience, their expressions in parental practices, and their consequences for children's well-being and growth. Discussing issues with implications beyond the study of parenthood, the book shows how the analysis of child outcomes which relate to parents' cultural belief systems (or parental "ethnotheories") can provide valuable insights into the nature and meaning of family and self in society and, in some cases, a basis for culturally sensitive therapeutic interventions. Illuminating the powerful influence of parents' cultural belief systems on the health and development of children, this volume will be welcomed by a broad audience. Anthropologists and psychologists interested in cultural theory and the interface of self and society will find a rich source of ideas and information. Parent educators, family therapists, pediatricians, and others who deal with ethnically diverse populations will discover invaluable information on what makes parents think and act the way they do. The book can be used as a primary text for courses in cognitive anthropology and cultural psychology, and as an auxiliary text for culturally oriented courses in lifespan development, education, health, and human services.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
User Review - Flag as inappropriate

good referrence for my studies.

Contents

Introduction
1
Parents Free Descriptions of Child
27
Processes of Generalization
56
THE NATURE AND ORIGINS OF PARENTS
121
Japanese Mothers Ideas
169
PART THREE
214
The Contrasting Developmental
270
The Negotiation
289
How Mayan Parental Theories
345
Parental Theories in the Management
364
Maternal Beliefs and Infant Care Practices
385
PART FIVE
405
Growth Consequences of LowIncome
428
The Three Rs of Dutch Childrearing
447
American Cultural Models of Early
496
Copyright

From Household Practices
313

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1996)

Sara Harkness and Charles M. Super, co-editors of Guilford's Culture and Human Development Series, have worked together on research with children and families in Africa, the United States, and Europe.

Sara Harkness, Ph.D. received her doctorate in Social Anthropology from Harvard University, where she was also a National Institute of Mental Health Postdoctoral Research Fellow, earned a Master of Public Health degree, and taught at the School of Public Health.

Charles M. Super, Ph.D., earned his doctorate in Developmental Psychology from Harvard University. In addition to his research and clinical work, he has consulted internationally for the United Nations and USAID.

Bibliographic information