Parish and Belonging: Community, Identity and Welfare in England and Wales, 1700–1950

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Cambridge University Press, 16. nov 2006
What role did the parish play in people's lives in England and Wales between 1700 and the mid-twentieth century? By comparison with globalisation and its dislocating effects, the book stresses how important parochial belonging once was. Professor Snell discusses themes such as settlement law and practice, marriage patterns, cultures of local xenophobia, the continuance of out-door relief in people's own parishes under the new poor law, the many new parishes of the period and their effects upon people's local attachments. The book highlights the continuing vitality of the parish as a unit in people's lives, and the administration associated with it. It employs a variety of historical methods, and makes important contributions to the history of welfare, community identity and belonging. It is highly relevant to the modern themes of globalisation, de-localisation, and the decline of community, helping to set such changes and their consequences into local historical perspective.
 

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Contents

Section 1
28
Section 2
81
Section 3
94
Section 4
115
Section 5
162
Section 6
179
Section 7
181
Section 8
183
Section 17
218
Section 18
220
Section 19
225
Section 20
227
Section 21
234
Section 22
292
Section 23
339
Section 24
366

Section 9
184
Section 10
185
Section 11
189
Section 12
200
Section 13
207
Section 14
213
Section 15
214
Section 16
216
Section 25
413
Section 26
423
Section 27
429
Section 28
454
Section 29
472
Section 30
474
Section 31
476
Section 32
496

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Page 25 - And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away. And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new.

About the author (2006)

K. D. M. Snell is Professor of Rural and Cultural History, Centre for English Local History, at the University of Leicester. His previous publications include Annals of the Labouring Poor: Social Change and Agrarian England, 1660-1900 (1985) and Rival Jerusalems: the Geography of Victorian Religion (2000).

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