Parliamentary Papers, 66. köide

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Page vii - means the Act of the session of the eleventh and twelfth years of the reign of Her present Majesty, chapter forty-three, intituled " An Act to facilitate the performance of the duties of justices of the peace out of sessions within England and Wales, with respect to summary convictions and orders...
Page lv - An Act to re-unite the Provinces of Upper and Lower Canada, and for the Government of Canada...
Page lxi - Act to continue for Two Years, and to the End of the then next Session of Parliament, and to amend, an Act of the Second and Third Years of Her present Majesty, intituled An Act to extend and render 'more effectual...
Page 34 - Majesty, chapter seventy-eight, intituled " An Act for the further amendment of the administration of the Criminal Law," or any Act amending the same, shall and may be exercised...
Page lxi - Five Years an Act passed in the Fourth Year of His late Majesty George the Fourth, to amend an Act passed in the Fiftieth Year of His Majesty George the Third, for preventing the administering and taking unlawful Oaths in Ireland.
Page 37 - An Act to extend the provisions of an Act passed in the first year of his late Majesty King William the Fourth, intituled An Act for consolidating and amending the laws for facilitating the payment of debts out of real estate.
Page 67 - The first is a statement of the declared value of British and Irish produce and manufactures exported from the United Kingdom...
Page xlii - Twelfth year of the Reign of his late Majesty King William the Third, intituled, An Act for the further Limitation of the Crown, and better securing the Rights and Liberties of the Subject...
Page 38 - Protestant Subjects dissenting from the Church of England from the Penalties of certain Laws...
Page 28 - I am confident that the three right honorable gentlemen opposite, the First Lord of the Treasury, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and the late President of the Board of Trade, will all with one voice answer "No." And why not? "Because," say they, "it will injure the revenue.

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