Participation Programs in Work Organizations: Past, Present, and Scenarios for the Future

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2002 - Business & Economics - 178 pages
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Employee participation programs have many faces, many definitions, many forms--and they change all the time. For some people they are meant to solve every problem in the workplace. For others they are ways to reduce resistance to management and its efforts to bring about organizational change. Still others see them as totally redundant and a hindrance to efficency and the implementation of good management practices. To make sense of it all, Bar-Haim integrates--historically, thematically, analytically--the wide but often incoherent knowledge we have about these programs, and in doing so portrays them in a clear, useful, multidimensional manner. The result is a work of scholarship and practical guidance that students, scholars, researchers, and executives will find important, an action-oriented source of vital information.

Bar-Haim shows that participation programs in work organizations have always attempted to solve three basic human problems, problems stemming from industrial democracy and equality, work alienation, and occupational and managerial effectiveness. To do this he uses a rare multidimensional technique. He describes and analyzes the processes and behavior of participation, participants, and organizational forms using a a variety of conceptual and theoretical frames drawn from the social and management sciences. He enhances our understanding of participation programs on micro and macro levels, and then provides practical guidelines from the real-world experience of other scholars and executives. Among the several ironies he discovers are that the roles of enthusiasts, opponents, and skeptics changed during the course of a jubilee of these programs. By integrating a large body of research and suggesting a formal model to evaluate existing employee programs and projected ones, his book attempts to ease the enigmatic ambivalence we have toward worker participation in general. In fact, he shows that by better understanding the dynamics of participation programs, it is possible for those who desire such programs to create, construct, and maintain better ones.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Participation Programs Mapping the Field
3
Problem Areas and Definitions
5
Indirect Representative Programs
21
Direct Participation Programs
27
Economic Participation Programs
43
Two Generations of Participation Programs
51
Workers Participation The First Generation
53
A Core Model of Participation Programs
113
Applying the Model to Specific Cases
127
Future of Participation Programs
135
Preparing the Ground for Constructing Scenarios
137
Future Scenarios of Participation Programs
143
Epilogue
151
Codetermination in German Coal Iron and Steel Industries
153
Data for Two Israeli Programs
155

Major Players of Workers Participation
57
Employee Involvement The Second Generation
71
Major Players of Employee Involvement
81
A General Model of Participation Programs
99
System Elements of Participation Programs
101
The Challenge of Mondragon
157
References
161
Index
177
Copyright

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Page 173 - Dyer, L. (1976) A model of organizational change in the context of union-management relations.

About the author (2002)

AVIAD BAR-HAIM heads the management and economics department at the Open University of Israel, Tel Aviv. He holds a doctorate in industrial sociology and organizational behavior from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and before his present assignment was the Open University's Dean for Academic Development. Among his current research and teaching interests are topics in organizational behavior and human resource management.

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