Party Lines: Competition, Partisanship, and Congressional Redistricting

Front Cover
Thomas E. Mann, Bruce E. Cain
Brookings Institution Press, May 31, 2008 - Political Science - 125 pages
1 Review

The legitimacy of the American electoral system depends on sustaining reasonable levels of fairness, accountability, responsiveness, and common sense. Recent Congressional elections fly in the face of those requirements, however, with a startling lack of competition, growing ideological polarization, and a fierce struggle between the parties to manipulate the electoral rules of the game. Party Lines addresses these problems head on in an authoritative and timely analysis of redistricting in the United States. The practice of state legislatures redrawing district lines after the decennial census has long been a controversial aspect of our governing system. Recent developments have added new urgency to earlier debates. The sorry spectacle of mid-decade partisan gerrymandering in Texas renewed public attention to the potential problems of redistricting, reinforcing the view that it is unfairly dominated by self-serving elected officials and parties. The perfunctory character of Congressional elections is another growing problem—in 2002, only four House incumbents were defeated in the general election, the lowest in American history. Despite a hotly contested presidential contest in 2004, that number increased by only three. In Pa rty Lines, eminent political analysts explain the legal and political history of redistricting since the one person–one vote revolution in the 1960s and place it in the larger context of American politics. The authors document the impact of redistricting on competition, polarization, and partisan fairness, and they assess the role technology played in the redistricting process. The final chapter analyzes options for reform, including most importantly the use of independent redistricting commissions as an alternative to the normal state legislative process. Redistricting reform is no panacea but it is a start toward ensuring that American voters still have the largest say in who will represent them. Contributors include Micah Altman (Harvard Universtity), Bruce Cain and Karin MacDonald (University of California, Berkeley),Cherie Maestas (Texas Tech), Sandy Maisel (Colby College), Thomas Mann (Brookings), Michael McDonald (George Mason University), Nathaniel Persily (University of Pennsylvania ), and Walter Stone (University of California, Davis).

 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jcvogan1 - LibraryThing

Overview of redistricting in 2005. Chapters on the case law since Baker v. Carr, computer usage, evidence of effect of redistricting. Seems to argue that the issue is not as bad as portrayed in the ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The Path of Political Reform since Baker v Carr
6
Chapter 2 The Impact of Redistricting on Candidate Emergence
31
Chapter 3 Pushbutton Gerrymanders? How Computing Has Changed Redistricting
51
Judicial Review of the Redistricting Process since Reynolds v Sims
67
What Is Desirable? Possible?
92
Contributors
115
Index
117
Back Flap
128
Back Cover
129
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Thomas E.Mann is a senior fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, where he holds the W. Averell Harriman Chair. He is a frequent media commentator on American politics. Bruce E. Cain is Heller Professor of Political Science at the University of California–Berkeley and director of the UC Washington Center. He is the author or editor of more than a dozen books.

Bibliographic information