Passage to India

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Methuen Drama, Sep 19, 2002 - Drama - 99 pages
First major theatrical adaptation of EM Forster's classic novel for a contemporary audience Before deciding whether to marry Chandrapore's local magistrate, Adela Quested wants to discover the "real India" for herself. Newly arrived from England, she agrees to see the Marabar Caves with the charming Dr Aziz. Through this one harmless event Forster exposes the absurdity, hysteria and depth of cultural ignorance that existed in British India in the twenties. E.M. Forster's classic novel is here adapted in this highly theatrical, humorous and faithful version for the stage by the author of BENT, Martin Sherman. Published to tie in with a major new production of A PASSAGE TO INDIA produced by Shared Experience Theatre company.

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User Review  - Renz0808 - LibraryThing

This is a classic tale by E.M. Forster about the clash of cultures in British India after the turn of the century. This book is one series of misunderstandings after another that ironically convey the ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Martin Sherman's work includes the plays Bent, When She Danced and Rose, the book for the musical The Boy from Oz and the screenplays for Alive and Kicking and Mrs Henderson Presents. Methuen Drama publish Sherman Plays: 1.

Edward Morgan Forster was born on January 1, 1879, in London, England. He never knew his father, who died when Forster was an infant. Forster graduated from King's College, Cambridge, with B.A. degrees in classics (1900) and history (1901), as well as an M.A. (1910). In the mid-1940s he returned to Cambridge as a professor, living quietly there until his death in 1970. Forster was named to the Order of Companions of Honor to the Queen in 1953. Forster's writing was extensively influenced by the traveling he did in the earlier part of his life. After graduating from Cambridge, he lived in both Greece and Italy, and used the latter as the setting for the novels Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905) and A Room with a View (1908). The Longest Journey was published in 1907. Howard's End was modeled on the house he lived in with his mother during his childhood. During World War I, he worked as a Red Cross Volunteer in Alexandria, aiding in the search for missing soldiers; he later wrote about these experiences in the nonfiction works Alexandria: A History and Guide and Pharos and Pharillon. His two journeys to India, in 1912 and 1922, resulted in A Passage to India (1924), which many consider to be Forster's best work; this title earned the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. Forster wrote only six novels, all prior to 1925 (although Maurice was not published until 1971, a year after Forster's death, probably because of its homosexual theme). For much of the rest of his life, he wrote literary criticism (Aspects of the Novel) and nonfiction, including biographies (Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson), histories, political pieces, and radio broadcasts. Howard's End, A Room with a View, and A Passage to India have all been made into successful films.

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