Passage to a Human World

Front Cover
Hudson Institute, 1987 - Political Science - 390 pages
"Singer convincingly demonstrates that econ-omic growth is the central reality of the modern era... His arguments are sometimes subtle, but he walks the reader through them with schematized subheadings, summaries, and relentless patience." --Peter Brimelow, The Wall Street Journal

Responding to the Club of Rome's Limit to Growth and its successors, Singer argues that the dominant characteristic of the modern era is almost completely unrecognized: the world's passage, in the few centuries surrounding our own, from poverty to wealth. This rapid transformation in the condition of human life--from poor to wealthy, from nature-dominated to human--dominated is described here, as are the reasons why it has been largely ignored.

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About the author (1987)

Milton Singernbsp;(1912-1994) was Paul Klapper Professor of Social Sciences and professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago. He was a fellow of the Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was also chosen as a distinguished lecturer by the American Anthropological Association and was the recipient of the Distinguished Scholar Award of the Association for Asian Studies.

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