Passing

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 2004 - Fiction - 94 pages
3 Reviews
"Absolutely absorbing, fascinating, and indispensable." — Alice Walker
"A work so fine, sensitive, and distinguished that it rises above race categories and becomes that rare object, a good novel." — The Saturday Review of Literature
Married to a successful physician and prominently ensconced in Harlem's vibrant society of the 1920s, Irene Redfield leads a charmed existence-until she is shaken out of it by a chance encounter with a childhood friend who has been "passing for white." An important figure in the Harlem Renaissance, Nella Larsen was the first African-American woman to be awarded a Guggenheim fellowship. Her fictional portraits of women seeking their identities through a fog of racial confusion were informed by her own Danish-West Indian parentage, and Passing offers fascinating psychological insights into issues of race and gender.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stipe168 - LibraryThing

"passing" refers to light-skinned african americans passing as white-skinned americans. it's a very interesting dynamic and this novel handles the confusion and fear associated with it. very well done. Read full review

Passing

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Another trailblazer, Larsen wrote this novel in 1929. It follows Clare Kendry and Irene Redfield, two light-skinned black women who try to escape racism. Kendry chooses to sever all ties with her ... Read full review

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Contents

ENCOUNTER
1
REENCOUNTER
37
FINALE
66
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

One of the shining stars of the Harlem Renaissance, Nellallitea "Nella" Larsen (April 13, 1891-March 30, 1964) left behind only two novels and a handful of short stories -- but Larsen's remarkable voice and vision has ensured her place in literary history.

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