Passing the GED: Reading / Apruebe El GED: English / Spanish on Facing Pages

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InterLingua Publishing, 2006 - Education - 423 pages
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"Passing the GED: Reading / Apruebe el GED: Lectura" is a bilingual (English / Spanish) test prep book produced in pdf format for those who expect to take the exam in Spanish or who prefer to study in Spanish and take the exam in English.
 

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Contents

IV
40
V
50
VI
62
VII
68
VIII
78
IX
90
X
104
XI
106
XVIII
172
XIX
180
XX
182
XXI
200
XXII
256
XXIII
276
XXIV
278
XXV
302

XII
116
XIII
122
XIV
132
XV
140
XVI
142
XVII
159
XXVI
312
XXVII
336
XXVIII
338
XXIX
348
XXX
368
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Page 14 - Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so ; For, those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow, Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me. From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures...
Page 82 - It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a...
Page 14 - Death be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so; For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me. From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be, Much pleasure, then from thee much more must flow; And soonest our best men with thee do go, Rest of their bones, and souls
Page 74 - Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
Page 14 - Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery. Thou art slave to Fate, Chance, kings, and desperate men, And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell; And poppy, or charms, can make us sleep as well And better than thy stroke: why swell'st thou then? One short sleep past, we wake eternally, And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

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