Past Meridian

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D. Appleton & Company, 1854 - Old age - 239 pages
 

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Page 13 - I know but one way of fortifying my soul against these gloomy presages and terrors of mind, and that is, by securing to myself the friendship and protection of that Being, who disposes of events, and governs futurity. He sees, at one view, the whole thread of my existence, not only that part of it which I have already passed through, but that which runs forward into all the depths of eternity.
Page 23 - And saying, We have piped unto you, and ye have not danced; we have mourned unto you, and ye have not lamented.
Page 172 - Or man, or woman. Yet I argue not Against Heaven's hand or will, nor bate a jot Of heart or hope, but still bear up and steer Right onward.
Page 211 - ... your putting a wanderer in the right road is charity ; your assisting the blind is charity ; your removing stones and thorns and other obstructions from the road is charity ; your giving water to the thirsty is charity. " A man's true wealth hereafter is the good he does in this world to his fellowman. When he dies, people will say, What property has he left behind him ? But the angels, who examine him in the grave, will ask, ' What good deeds hast thou sent before thee?
Page 13 - I recommend myself to his care; when I awake, I give myself up to his direction. Amidst all the evils that threaten me, I will look up to him for help, and question not but he will either avert them, or turn them to my advantage. Though I know neither the time nor the manner of the death I am to die, I am not at all solicitous about it; because I am sure that he knows them both, and that he will not fail to comfort and support me under them.
Page 158 - Life ! we've been long together, Through pleasant and through cloudy weather ; 'Tis hard to part when friends are dear — Perhaps 'twill cost a sigh, a tear : — Then steal away, give little warning, Choose thine own time ; Say not ' Good night ' — but in some brighter clime Bid me
Page 211 - Your smiling in your brother's face is charity; an exhortation of your fellow man to virtuous deeds is equal to alms-giving; your putting a wanderer in the right road is charity; your assisting the blind is charity; your removing stones and thorns and other obstructions from the road is charity; your giving water to the thirsty is charity. 'A man's true wealth hereafter is the good he does in this world to his fellow man. When he dies, people will say, What property has he left behind him?
Page 84 - THIS is the place. Stand still, my steed, Let me review the scene, And summon from the shadowy Past The forms that once have been.
Page 54 - I thank God, her death was as easy as her life was innocent; and as it cost her not a groan, or even a sigh, there is yet upon her countenance such an expression of tranquillity, nay, almost of pleasure, that it is even amiable to behold it. It would afford the finest image of a saint expired that ever painting drew; and it would be the greatest obligation which even that obliging art could ever bestow on a friend, if you could come and sketch it for me.
Page 210 - Every good act, he would say, is charity. Your smiling in your brother's face is charity; an exhortation of your fellow man to virtuous deeds is equal to alms-giving; your putting a wanderer in the right road is charity; your assisting the blind is charity; your removing stones and thorns and other obstructions from the road is charity; your giving water to the thirsty is charity.

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