The Path of the King

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House of Stratus, Sep 23, 2008 - Fiction - 256 pages
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This collection of fourteen short stories shows John Buchan's talent for heroic adventures. Hightown under Sunfell is set in the time of the Vikings. The End of the Road is set in the historical period of Abraham Lincoln. The periods of history in between are covered in his other tales.
 

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Contents

Prologue
1
Hightown under Sunfell
3
The Englishman
22
The Wife of Flanders
39
Eyes of Youth
54
The Maid
73
The Wood of Life
87
Eaucourt by the Waters
104
The Regicide
141
The Marplot
156
The Lit Chamber
172
In the Dark Land
188
The Last Stage
202
The End of the Road
214
Epilogue
243
Copyright

The Hidden City
125

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About the author (2008)

John Buchan, Baron Tweedsmuir, was a Scottish diplomat, barrister, journalist, historian, poet and novelist. He wrote adventure novels, short-story collections and biographies. His passion for the Scottish countryside is reflected in much of his writing. Buchan's adventure stories are high in romance and are peopled by a large cast of characters. 'Richard Hannay', 'Dickson McCunn' and 'Sir Edward Leithen' are three that reappear several times. Alfred Hitchcock adapted his most famous book 'The Thirty-Nine Steps', featuring Hannay, for the big screen. Born in 1875 in Perth, Buchan was the son of a minister. Childhood holidays were spent in the Borders, for which he had a great love. He was educated at Glasgow University and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he was President of the Union. Called to the Bar in 1901, he became Lord Milner's assistant private secretary in South Africa. By 1907, however, he was working as a publisher with Nelson's. During the First World War Buchan was a correspondent at the Front for 'The Times', as well as being an officer in the Intelligence Corps and advisor to the War Cabinet. Elected as a Conservative Member of Parliament for one of the Scottish Universities' seats in 1927, he was created Baron Tweedsmuir in 1935. From then, until his death in 1940, he served as Governor General of Canada, during which time he nevertheless managed to continue writing.

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