Paths to Justice: What People Do and Think about Going to Law

Front Cover
Hart Publishing, 1999 - Law - 382 pages
"Effective policy-making in the administration of justice requires a solid understanding of public behaviour. This book presents the results of the most wide-ranging survey ever conducted by an independent body or government agency into the experiences of ordinary citizens as they grapple with the kinds of problems that could ultimately end in the civil courts. Funded by the Nuffield Foundation, the survey identifies how often people experience problems for which there might be a legal solution and how they set about solving them. Revealing crucial differences in the approach taken to different kinds of potential legal problems, the study describes the factors that influence decisions about whether and where to seek advice about problems, and whether and when to go to law. In addition to exploring experiences of courts, tribunals and ADR processes, the study also provides important insights into public confidence in the courts and the judiciary. For the first time the study reveals the public's perspective on access to civil justice and makes a significant contribution to debate about how far civil justice reforms coincide with public experience and expectations about resolving justiciable problems."--Back cover.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Landscape of Justiciable Problems
21
Strategies for Resolving Justiciable Problems
67
The Response to Problems of Different Types
105
Outcomes
145
Fulfilling Objectives?
179
Experiences and Perceptions of the Legal System
215
Which Way Now?
249
Appendix A Technical Report
265
Appendix B Logistical Regression Analysis Results
275
Questionnaires
289
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Hazel Genn, CBE, FBA, is Professor of Socio-Legal Studies at University College, London.

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