Pathways to Recovery: A Strengths Recovery Self-help Workbook

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University of Kansas School of Social Welfare, 2002 - Mentally ill - 414 pages
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"Before I heard of Pathways, my mental illness defined me. When I started the workbook, I realized my recovery defined me. By the time I finished it, I realized I could define my own life." Pathways Reader This quote by a reader of Pathways to Recovery points to the impact the workbook-and its accompanying group facilitator's guide-continue to have for individuals who experience symptoms associated with mental illnesses. Now in its sixth printing, the workbook has developed a strong and loyal following. In 2003, Pathways was listed as one of the top three national recovery education tools by the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation and it received the Lilly Reintegration Award in 2009. It has also been widely used by the U.S. Veteran's Administration, several state Departments of Mental Health and a wide variety of consumer-run organizations. Individual readers, family members, peer support workers and other mental health providers throughout the United States and internationally have used the workbook with great success. Working in partnership with recovery educators, consumer co-authors and an advisory group of Kansas consumers to develop the materials, Pathways to Recovery translates the evidence-supported approach of the Strengths Model-an approach developed in Kansas and that has been used effectively for over twenty years worldwide-into a person-centered, self-help approach. The Strengths Model has proven successful in reducing psychiatric hospitalization, allowing people to set and achieve person goals and, in turn, improve one's quality of life. Pathways to Recovery puts the process of setting goals and creating personal recovery plans into a self-guided format. The workbook doesn't concentrate on psychiatric symptoms, treatments or disorders. Instead, the book guides readers through a process of exploring their own recovery journey while creating a long-range vision for their lives. The workbook format guides individuals to explore their current lives and set goals across ten life domains that include creating a home, learning, working, nurturing a social circle, intimacy and sexuality, wellness, leisure and spirituality.

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About the author (2002)

Priscilla Ridgway After working over 30 years in the mental health field, I'm suddenly much more optimistic! I've working in direct practice, disability rights, supported housing, policy analysis & best practice research-specifically to understand resilience & advance consumer voice. My own experiences as an accidental mystic, a person with a traumatic brain injury and someone who has struggled with depression & PTSD have given me a greater depth of awareness. I am in love with the power of resilience & creativity that allow us to heal & be transformed. Diane McDiarmid At the University of Kansas, I served as Director of the Strengths Recovery, Supported Education & Consumer as Provider projects. I've taught the Strengths Perspective across the U.S. & internationally and served as an adjunct professor, developing course curricula and teaching social work classes in the School of Social Welfare. With many years of experience in direct clinical practice, policy & administration, I've witnessed the positive impact on people's lives from implementing a strengths-based perspective. Lori Davidson I've worked in the mental health field for over 20 years, learning from each story that has been shared with me. Over this time, I have come to realize that the line between us is very thin, if not non-existant. I draw on my own journey with depression as a major factor in supporting individuals to take risks on their own recovery journey. Julie Bayes During the writing of Pathways, I served as a consumer provider in the psychosocial program at Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center in Lawrence, Kansas and on the board of directors of Independence, Inc., an independent living resource center. While working as a journalist & television producer, I was diagnosed in 1986 with multiple personality disorder. After struggling with my illness for 10 years, I finally started working on recovery. Through individual therapy & skills work, I learned to relate to the world around me. My motto became "what we think, we become." I live each day by those words & regularly continue my advocacy work. Sarah Ratzlaff In addition to working on Pathways to Recovery, I was the research assistant for the Supported Education Group at the University of Kansas School of Social Welfare, developing research for the Kansas Consumer as Provider program and other supported education initiatives. I continue to be infinitely inspired by this book and the stories I've heard.

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