Patterns of Moral Complexity

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 30, 1987 - Philosophy - 193 pages
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Larmore aims to recover three forms of moral complexity that have often been neglected by moral and political philosophers. First, he argues that virtue is not simply the conscientious adherence to principle. Rather, the exercise of virtue apply. He argues - and this is the second pattern of complexity - that recognizing the value of constitutive ties with shared forms of life does not undermine the liberal ideal of political neutrality toward differing ideals of the good life. Finally Larmore agrues for what he calls the heterogeneity of morality. Moral thinking need not be exclusively deontological or consequentialist, and we should recognize that the ultimate sources of moral value are diverse. The arguments presented here do not attack the possibility of moral theory. But in addressing some of the central issues of moral and political thinking today thay attempt to restore to that thinking greater flexibility and a necessary sensitivity to our common experience.
 

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Contents

III
1
IV
5
V
14
VI
19
VII
22
VIII
23
IX
27
X
36
XIX
70
XX
77
XXI
85
XXII
91
XXIII
99
XXIV
107
XXV
118
XXVI
131

XI
40
XII
42
XIII
48
XIV
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XV
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XVI
59
XVII
67
XVIII
69
XXVII
134
XXVIII
139
XXIX
144
XXX
151
XXXI
154
XXXII
181
XXXIII
191
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About the author (1987)

Charles Larmore is professor of philosophy at Columbia University and the author of "Patterns of Moral Complexity" and of many articles and reviews on 20th century European thought in journals of philosophy.

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