Paul Celan: Selections

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University of California Press, Mar 14, 2005 - Poetry - 242 pages
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The best introduction to the work of Paul Celan, this anthology offers a broad collection of his writing in unsurpassed English translations along with a wealth of commentaries by major writers and philosophers. The present selection is based on Celan's own 1968 selected poems, though enlarged to include both earlier and later poems, as well as two prose works, The Meridian, Celan's core statement on poetics, and the narrative Conversation in the Mountains. This volume also includes letters to Celan's wife, the artist Gisèle Celan-Lestrange; to his friend Erich Einhorn; and to René Char and Jean-Paul Sartre—all appearing here for the first time in English.
 

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Contents

III
41
IV
42
V
43
VI
44
VII
46
VIII
48
IX
49
X
50
LVI
120
LVII
121
LX
122
LXII
123
LXIII
124
LXV
125
LXVI
126
LXVII
127

XI
51
XII
52
XIII
54
XIV
56
XV
58
XVI
61
XVII
63
XVIII
65
XIX
67
XX
75
XXI
76
XXII
78
XXIII
79
XXIV
81
XXV
83
XXVI
85
XXVII
86
XXVIII
88
XXIX
89
XXX
91
XXXI
93
XXXII
97
XXXIII
98
XXXV
99
XXXVI
100
XXXVIII
103
XL
104
XLI
105
XLII
106
XLIII
107
XLIV
108
XLV
109
XLVI
110
XLVII
111
XLVIII
112
L
113
LI
114
LII
115
LIII
116
LIV
117
LV
118
LXVIII
128
LXIX
129
LXX
130
LXXII
131
LXXV
132
LXXVI
133
LXXVII
134
LXXIX
135
LXXX
136
LXXXI
137
LXXXIII
138
LXXXV
139
LXXXVI
140
LXXXIX
141
XCI
142
XCIII
143
XCV
144
XCVIII
145
XCIX
149
C
154
CI
177
CII
178
CIII
179
CIV
181
CV
183
CVI
186
CVII
188
CVIII
191
CIX
193
CX
196
CXI
197
CXII
198
CXIII
199
CXIV
203
CXV
205
CXVI
209
CXVII
215
CXVIII
217
CXIX
225
CXX
229
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Page 47 - Deutschland he calls scrape that fiddle more darkly then hover like smoke in the air then scoop out a grave in the clouds where it's roomy to lie Black milk of morning we drink you at night we drink you at noontime Death is a gang-boss aus Deutschland we drink you at dusktime and dawntime we drink and drink Death is a gang-boss aus Deutschland his eye is blue he hits you with leaden bullets his aim is true there's a man in this house your golden hair Margareta he sets his dogs on our trail he gives...
Page 46 - ... you men you other men play up again for the dance Black milk of morning we drink you at night we drink you at noontime and dawntime we drink you at dusktime we drink and drink there's a man in this house your golden hair Margareta your ashen hair Shulamite he cultivates snakes He calls play...
Page 31 - ... musicality' in such a way that it has nothing in common with the 'euphony' which more or less blithely continued to sound alongside the greatest horrors.
Page 47 - ... Margareta he writes it and walks from the house and the stars all start flashing he whistles his dogs to draw near whistles his Jews to appear starts us scooping a grave out of sand he commands us play up for the dance Black milk of morning we drink you at night we drink you at dawntime and noontime we drink you at dusktime we drink and drink There's a man in this house who cultivates snakes and who writes who writes when it's nightfall nach Deutschland your golden hair Margareta your ashen hair...
Page 47 - ... cultivates snakes and who writes who writes when it's nightfall nach Deutschland your golden hair Margareta he writes it and walks from the house and the stars all start flashing he whistles his dogs to draw near whistles his Jews to appear starts us scooping a grave out of sand he commands us play up for the dance Black milk of morning we drink you at night we drink you at dawntime and noontime we drink you at dusktime we drink and drink There's a man in this house who cultivates snakes and...
Page 31 - This language, notwithstanding its inalienable complexity of expression, is concerned with precision. It does not transfigure or render 'poetical'; it names, it posits, it tries to measure the area of the given and the possible. True, this is never the working of language itself, language as such, but always of an...
Page 16 - Only in the mother tongue can one speak one's own truth. In a foreign tongue the poet lies...

About the author (2005)

One of the greatest poets to write in German and among the most gifted writers of the twentieth century in any language, Paul Celan was born in Czernowitz, Bukovina, in 1920. He survived the Holocaust and settled in Paris in 1948, where he lived until his suicide by drowning in 1970. Pierre Joris is the author of many books of poetry as well as a range of anthologies and translations; he recently published A Nomad Poetics, a volume of essays. In 2003 he was Berlin Prize fellow at the American Academy in Berlin. He is Professor of English at the State University of New York, Albany.

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