Pay Dirt: The Business of Professional Team Sports

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 1997 - Business & Economics - 538 pages
1 Review

Why would a Japanese millionaire want to buy the Seattle Mariners baseball team, when he has admitted that he has never played in or even seen a baseball game? Cash is the answer: major league baseball, like professional football, basketball, and hockey, is now big business with the potential to bring millions of dollars in profits to owners. Not very long ago, however, buying a sports franchise was a hazardous investment risked only by die-hard fans wealthy enough to lose parts of fortunes made in other businesses. What forces have changed team ownership from sports-fan folly to big-business savvy? Why has The Wall Street Journal become popular reading in pro sports locker rooms? And why are sports pages now dominated by economic clashes between owners and players, cities with franchises and cities without them, leagues and players' unions, and team lawyers and players' lawyers? In answering these questions, James Quirk and Rodney Fort have written the most complete book on the business and economics of professional sports, past and present.

Pay Dirt offers a wealth of information and analysis on the reserve clause, salary determination, competitive balance in sports leagues, the market for franchises, tax sheltering, arenas and stadiums, and rival leagues. The authors present an abundance of historical material, much of it new, including team ownership histories and data on attendance, TV revenue, stadium and arena contracts, and revenues and costs. League histories, team statistics, stories about players and owners, and sports lore of all kinds embellish the work. Quirk and Fort are writing for anyone interested in sports in the 1990s: players, players' agents, general managers, sportswriters, and, most of all, sports fans.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

Pay dirt: the business of professional team sports

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

News headlines within the past few months have begun to resemble a "Who's on first?'' routine. The commissioners of both major league baseball and the National Hockey League have been forced to resign ... Read full review

Contents

V
1
VI
23
VII
88
VIII
125
IX
179
X
209
XI
240
XII
294
XVI
369
XVII
374
XVIII
377
XIX
378
XX
479
XXI
505
XXII
513
XXIII
531

XIII
333
XIV
363
XV
366

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1997)

Michael Fairley has been writing and speaking about label and packaging materials, technology and applications since the 1970s, both as the founder of Labels & Labeling and other print industry magazine titles and as an international consultant writing label industry market and technology research reports for the likes of Frost & Sullivan, Economist Intelligence Unit, Pira, InfoTrends and Labels & Labelling Consultancy.

He now works as a consultant to Tarsus Exhibitions & Publishing - which organizes the Labelexpo shows, Label Summits and publishes Labels & Labeling magazine - as well as regularly speaking at industry conferences and seminars.

He is a Fellow of the Institute of Packaging / Packaging Society, Fellow of IP3, a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Stationers, an Honorary Life Member of FINAT and a Licentiate of the City & Guilds of London Institute. He was awarded the R. Stanton Avery Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009.

Danielle Jerschefske is the North America Editor for Labels & Labeling magazine, holding a Bachelor's degree in International Studies from the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. Danielle regularly presents at leading industry conferences on subjects including environmental strategies, interactive packaging, regional and global trends, and the rise of the private label.

Danielle has closely followed the emergence of environmental consciousness within the label industry and was awarded 'Publication of the Year - 2007' in the article category for her piece, 'Green 101' by the PNEAC. She is an active participant in the TLMI environmental committee, its recycling subcommittee and a proponent of the Phoenix Challenge Foundation.

Fort is Professor of Economics at Washington State University.

Bibliographic information