Peace Is Oneness: A New Vision of Science and Religion

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iUniverse, Nov 3, 2011 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 172 pages

HUMANITY HAS REACHED A DANGEROUS TIPPING POINT of potential self-destruction because our technical and scientific achievements have out distanced our spiritual realization. We must develop a new understanding of who we are, centered on the realization of oneness with all of creation. This realization can only be achieved by the combination and integration of rational logical thinking and mystical internal awareness.

Humanity has now reached the point where the two separate understandings of reality must be combined into a holistic understanding of existence. Peace Is Oneness addresses the dangers of accepting the separation that results from our egos, along with the ways that separation can be healed. Both science and evolutionary religion define the same reality. We must awaken from our dream state of separate selves and realize the oneness that is our true self of unconditional love.

Western culture has largely lost most of its connection to myth because of the dominance of material science. We have what the ancient Greeks called logos, but we have lost what they called mythos. This is about to change, as science and religion begin to define reality in the same way. Will it happen quickly enough to save us from our own self destruction? Your individual consciousness is essential in determining the outcome.

 

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Contents

Attaining Peace
1
Where Are We Now?
9
Evolution of Religion in the West
19
The Age of Science
38
Potential Healing Bridges
59
The Landscape of Reality
82
PsychologyBridge between Science and Religion
96
The ReligionScience of Universal Love
111
The NewOld Reality
126
The Practice of Universal Love
135
You Are the One
141
References
147
Bibliography
153
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About the author (2011)

HILTON L. ANDERSON holds bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in psychology. He has been married for fifty-nine years; he and his wife have three children and seven grandchildren. A lifelong resident of New Jersey, he has traveled extensively since retirement, visiting Europe, Asia, and all fifty of the United States.

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