Peace Without Dishonour--war Without Hope: Being a Calm and Dispassionate Enquiry Into the Question of the Chesapeake, and the Necessity and Expediency of War

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Greenough and Stebbins, 1807 - Chesapeake-Leopard Affair, 1807 - 43 pages
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Page 21 - faave jiist apprehended four-seamen desert" Ŧrs from the Valeureuse frigate, which " I found o'n board an' American 'brig, " where they had engaged at seventeen
Page 36 - Scotia then supplied them with little or nothing ; she can now supply them i(iitb nearly all they want. They do not take our beef and pork in peace, they are so dainty; and yet we talk of starving them ! But if they could...
Page 33 - If we look back to the two last years of our revolution war, a judgment may be formed on this point. A striking defect in her naval arrangements in preceding years, left our ports open for the entry of commerce, for the equipping of privateers and the introduction of prizes. A different arrangement in the latter period of that war totally changed the scene. The small privateers were hauled up, as, no longer able to cope even with their armed merchantmen, and the larger privateers were taken. Our...
Page 33 - ... war totally changed the scene. The small privateers were hauled up, as, no longer able to cope even with their armed merchantmen, and the larger privateers were taken. Our mercantile shipping fell, at the same time, a sacrifice to the vigilant operations of the British navy. At the present moment her naval power is extended beyond all former examples ; while that of her enemies is at least not increased.
Page 37 - ... nearly all they want. They do not take our beef and pork in peace, they are so dainty; and yet we talk of starving them ! But if they could support a war of eight years, when Nova Scotia was a young uncultivated country, when our privateers swarmed in these seas, and the ocean was covered ' with the fleets of France, Spain, and Holland ; how much easier will it be to sustain a war, when the...
Page 33 - ... now depending on its preservation, be involved in ruin. The people at large, from the summit of prosperity would be plunged into an abyss of misery too sudden and too severe patiently to be borne. To increase their calamities, or make them felt more sensibly, direct taxes must be levied to support the war ; and it would be happy for us if we could contemplate only a foreign war in which all hearts and hands might be united.
Page 32 - Seeing she has the command of the sea (and appearances strongly indicate that she will maintain that command) our commerce might in one year be annihilated, and thousands of our seamen be shut up or dying in jails and prison ships. In addition to her fleets and cruisers now in commission, privateers would swarm, as soon as an object so alluring and so assailable as the American commerce should present. If we look back to the...
Page 25 - BritiilT fquadron had loft nearly an hundred men, between March and June, and great rewards had been oifered at Halifax, by the Province, for the apprehenfion of thefe deferters.
Page 21 - This cafe, though an extravagant one, and partaking of the character of French domination, is urong evidence of the general underftanding of military men, that " deferters from publick fervice cannot be harboured.
Page 29 - If our little band of 3000 foldiers, could be drawn off from the. defence of a frontier of 5000 miles, and from our tottering forts, more dangerous to their defenders than their aflailānts, and if Mr.

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