Peacebuilding: From Concept to Commission

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Routledge, Feb 15, 2013 - Political Science - 224 pages
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The emergence of The United Nations Peacebuilding Commission (PBC) in 2005 was the culmination of a long and contentious process. In this work Rob Jenkins provides a concise introduction that traces the origins and evolution of peacebuilding as a concept, the creation and functioning of the PBC as an institution, and the complicated relationship between these two processes.

Jenkins discusses how continued contestation over what exactly peacebuilding is, and how its objectives can most effectively be achieved, influenced the institutional design and de facto functioning of the PBC, its structure, mandate and origins. He then moves on to examine the peacebuilding architecture in action and analyses the role that the PBC has carved out for itself, reflecting on the future prospects for the organization.

The theory and practice of peacebuilding has assumed increasing importance over the last decade, and this work is essential reading for all students of conflict resolution, peace studies and international relations.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
A contested and evolving concept
18
Structure mandate and origins
44
The peacebuilding architecture in action 200608
74
The peacebuilding architecture in action 200810
108
5 Conclusion
135
Notes
149
Bibliography
177
Index
188
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About the author (2013)

Rob Jenkins is Professor of Political Science at Hunter College and the Graduate Center at The City University of New York. Formerly Professor of Politics at the University of London, he has published widely on Indian politics, movements for democratic accountability, and the politics of international economic and security assistance.

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