Peacekeeping and Related Stability Operations

Front Cover
Nova Publishers, 2005 - Political Science - 81 pages
One of the most crucial and difficult tasks in peacekeeping and related stability operations is creating a secure and stable environment, both for the foreign peacekeepers and for the indigenous population. During the past decade, the United States and the international community have tried various approaches to providing that security. Most of these approaches have included the use of United Nations International Civilian Police (UNCIVPOL), whose forces are contributed on a case by case basis by UN member states. (While other countries usually contribute police personnel from their own national forces, the United States contracts those it contributes through a private corporation). In a few cases, such as Afghanistan and Iraq at this time, coalition and US military forces, and not the United Nation, train and work with indigenous police forces to provide security. This book presents an up-to-date evaluation of current issues in peacekeeping.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Acronyms
5
Background
7
Evolution of Roles and Functions
8
System and Security Gaps
10
Current Systems and Reforms
13
United Nations Civilian Police System
14
US Civilian Police Program
25
European Reforms
32
Options for Congress
39
Other Options to Strengthen Current Capabilities and Address System and Security Gaps
45
Policing In Selected UN Peacekeeping and Related Operations 19892004 Data Current as of February 2004
53
Historical Background Early International and Cold War UN Police Operations
63
Copyright

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