Pélléas and Mélisande: Alladine and Palomides, Home

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Dodd, Mead, 1896 - French drama - 205 pages
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Page 108 - One doesn't know what they have done. . . . Seventh Servant. What is to be done when the masters are afraid? ... [A silence.] First Servant. I no longer hear the children screaming. Second Servant. They are sitting down before the ventilator. Third Servant. They are huddled against each other.
Page 22 - MELISANDE discovered at the brink of a spring. [Enter GOLAUD.] GOLAUD. I shall never be able to get out of this forest again. — God knows where that beast has led me. And yet I thought I had wounded him to death ; and here are traces of blood. But now I have lost sight of him; I believe I am lost myself — my dogs can no longer find me — I shall retrace my steps. ... I hear weeping . . . Oh ! oh ! what is there yonder by the water's edge ? ... A little girl weeping by the water's edge ? [He...
Page 112 - ... we saw each other? GOLAUD (to ARKEL and the PHYSICIAN). Will you withdraw a moment, if you please, if you please ? . . . I will leave the door wide open. . . . One moment only. . . . I would say something to her ; else I could not die. . . . Will you ? — Go clear to the end of the corridor ; you can come back at once, at once. . . . Do not refuse me this. ... I am a wretch. . . . [Exit ARKEL and the PHYSICIAN.] — Melisande, hast thou pity on me, as I have pity on thee ? . . . Melisande?
Page 21 - It is wide open 1 [All the maidservant* appear on the threshold and pass over it.] FIRST MAIDSERVANT. I am going to wash the sill first. . . . SECOND MAIDSERVANT. We shall never be able to clean all this.
Page 71 - Look ; some one is going by with a lantern in the garden. — But I have been told they did not like each other. ... It seems they often quarrel ; . . no? Is it true? YNIOLD. Yes, yes ; it is true. GOLAUD. Yes ? — Ah ! ah ! — But what do they quarrel about ? YNIOLD. About the door. GOLAUD. What ? — about the door ? — What are you talking about ? — No, come, explain youi self ; why do they quarrel about the door ? YNIOLD.
Page 118 - Her eyes are full of tears. — It is her soul weeping now. . . . Why does she stretch her arms out so ? — What would she ? THE PHYSICIAN. It is toward the child, without doubt. . . . It is the struggle of motherhood against . . . GOLAUD. At this moment ? — At this moment ? — You must say. Say ! Say ! . . . THE PHYSICIAN. Perhaps. GOLAUD. At once? ... Oh ! oh ! I must tell her. ... — Me'lisande ! Me'lisande ! . . . Leave me alone ! leave me alone with her ! . . . ARKEL.
Page 83 - Pelleas's father is saved, and sickness, the old handmaid of Death, has left the castle, a little joy and a little sunlight will at last come into the house again. ... It was time ! — For, since thy coming, we have only lived here whispering about a closed room. . . . And truly I have pitied thee, Melisande.
Page 89 - He does n't hear me any more. They are too far away already. . . . They go quick. . . . They are not making a noise any more. ... It is no longer the road to the stable . . . Where are they going to sleep tonight ? — Oh ! oh ! — It is too dark . . . I am going to tell something to somebody. . . . [Exit.] SCENE IV — A fountain in the park. [Enter PELLEAS.] S.
Page 119 - Hush! . . . Hush! . . . We must speak softly now. — She must not be disturbed. . . . The human soul is very silent. . . . The human soul likes to depart alone. ... It suffers so timorously. . . . But the sadness, Golaud . . . the sadness of all we see!
Page 36 - There is always a wonderful silence here. . . . One could hear the water sleep. . . . Will you sit down on the edge of the marble basin? There is one linden where the sun never comes.

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