Penological and Preventive Principles

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Wertheimer, 1889 - Crime - 414 pages
 

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Page 235 - In the morning sow thy seed, and in the evening withhold not thy hand: for thou knowest not whether shall prosper, either this or that, or whether they both shall be alike good.
Page 221 - Let the holiest and best thing we do be considered ; we are never better affected unto God than when we pray ; yet when we pray, how are our affections many times distracted ! How little reverence do we show unto the grand majesty of God, unto whom we speak ! How little remorse of our own miseries ! How little taste of the sweet influence of his tender mercies do we feel! Are we not as unwilling many times to begin, and as glad to make an end ; as if in saying, call upon me, he had set us a very...
Page 221 - God in that, which is done, respecteth the mind and intention of the doer : cut off then all those things, wherein we have regarded our own glory, those things which men do to please men...
Page 190 - ... payment from the gaol was properly lowered. But probably the most important advantage of all would arise from extending to this class of prisoners the system of release on licence under surveillance. Of all measures of punishment or prevention I consider this the most valuable. As a punishment, it is so slight that it may be continued for a long period. If twelve months of surveillance be equally disliked with one month of imprisonment, the one will keep a man out of mischief for one month, the...
Page 224 - We hear much of various systems of prison discipline, as the Separate, the Silent, and the Congregate systems, but unless the CHRISTIAN system be brought to bear, with Divine power, on the understanding and consciences of criminals, every other system, professedly contemplating their reformation, must prove an utter failure. We willingly concede to various modes of prison discipline their just measure of importance, but to expect that human machinery, however perfect, can take the place of GOD'S...
Page 8 - Tumble Nature heel o'er head, and, yelling with the yelling street, Set the feet above the brain and swear the brain is in the feet. Bring the old dark ages back without the faith, without the hope, Break the State, the Church, the Throne, and roll their ruins down the slope. Authors— essayist, atheist, novelist, realist, rhymester, play your part, Paint the mortal shame of nature with the living hues of Art. Rip your brothers...
Page 121 - The sixteen cases of the last three years, under the altered system, occurred among a population of 2387 prisoners, undergoing, within that period, an average imprisonment of 224 days. The difference, therefore, in the proportion of the insane cases at these two periods is as 1 to 8-42, that is, the insanity under the altered system has been EIGHT TIMES greater than during the four preceding years, when the original tyttan was in FULL OPERATION. Even if the first year should be included, the proportion...
Page 217 - The importance of selecting good officers for prison duties cannot be overrated. The officer who is in charge of prisoners has such power, for good or evil, over his fellow-men, that I do not think there are many positions more responsible than that which he occupies. Nor, on the whole, are there, I think, many in which the officer is exposed to more temptations to neglect his duty, or abuse his trust.
Page 78 - To secure the spirit and manner of administration sketched in the foregoing detail the most vigilant inspection and oversight are required. " The dark places of the earth are full of cruelty," and prisons are exceeding dark places in the sense of being screened from observation. Prison walls are as effectual in keeping critics out as in keeping culprits in. The class of officials who look upon the inmates of their institutions as mere subjects for discipline and severity have a thousand ways of evading...
Page 118 - ... from the nature of the society will it receive its direction. Every association of convicts, then, that can be formed, will in a greater or less degree pervert, but will never reform, those of which it is composed: and we are brought to the irresistible conclusion that classification once admitted to be useful, it is so in an inverse proportion to the numbers of which each class is composed ; and is not perfect until we come to the point at which it loses its name and nature, in the complete...

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