Pensamientos sobre la educación

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Ediciones AKAL, May 30, 1986 - Education - 386 pages
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“Creo poder asegurar que de cien personas hay noventa que son lo que son, buenas o malas, útiles o inútiles a la sociedad, debido a la educación que han recibido. Es de ahí de donde viene la gran diferencia entre los hombres”, En dicha creencia basa Locke sus concepciones educativas, preponderantes en las sociedades liberales europeas que se van conformando con el ascenso y predominio de las clases burguesas. Frente al viejo ideal de la educación renacentista –humanista pero aristocratizante- el utilitarismo del filósofo inglés iba a influir poderosamente en la reforma de la enseñanza –reducción de los castigos, atención a la naturaleza particular del niño, reivindicación de la importancia de las lengua, ....- y en definitiva en la educación y formación específica del gentleman.
 

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Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
31
Section 3
33
Section 4
35
Section 5
65
Section 6
75
Section 7
79
Section 8
87
Section 18
165
Section 19
169
Section 20
173
Section 21
177
Section 22
181
Section 23
185
Section 24
189
Section 25
195

Section 9
93
Section 10
97
Section 11
105
Section 12
121
Section 13
135
Section 14
141
Section 15
143
Section 16
153
Section 17
157
Section 26
197
Section 27
207
Section 28
269
Section 29
271
Section 30
275
Section 31
279
Section 32
355
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About the author (1986)

John Locke's works of political and social philosophy, written in the 17th century, have strongly influenced intellectuals ever since - including the founders of the United States of America. Born in 1632 in Wrington, England, Locke studied at Christ Church, Oxford, where he earned his B.A. and M.A. degrees in the late 1650's. He also studied medicine and earned a medical license. His studies led to an interest in contemporary philosophers influenced by science, such as Rene Descartes. Locke read widely among them while teaching at Christ Church over the next few years. In 1667, Locke became personal physician and adviser to Anthony Ashley Cooper, who later was appointed Earl of Shaftesbury. Through Shaftesbury's patronage, Locke earned some government posts and entered London's intellectual circles, all the while writing philosophy. He was one of the best-known European thinkers of his time when he died in 1704. In An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), Locke established the philosophy of empiricism, which holds that the mind at birth is a blank tablet. Experience, Locke believed, would engrave itself upon the tablet as one grew. He felt humans should create theories according to experience and test them with experiments. This philosophy helped establish the scientific method. Locke codified the principals of liberalism in "Two Treatises of Government" (1690). He emphasized that the state must preserve its citizens' natural rights to life, liberty and property. When the state does not, Locke argued, citizens are justified in rebelling. His view of liberalism comprised limited government, featuring elected representation and legislative checks and balances. While a Christian, Locke believed in absolute separation of church and state, and he urged toleration of those whose religious views differed from the majorities.

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