Pension Plans and Employee Performance: Evidence, Analysis, and Policy

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University of Chicago Press, 1997 - Business & Economics - 259 pages
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In this provocative book, Richard A. Ippolito explores the relationship between employees' preferences for certain types of pension plans and their productivity. Ippolito begins by reviewing how pensions influence workers' behavior on the job, helping employers reduce early quit rates and increase early retirement rates. In a novel contribution, Ippolito then shows how pensions can assist employers in attracting and retaining workers who have personal attributes valued by the firm.

Challenging the accepted view of defined contribution plans, such as the 401k, as merely convenient tax-deferred savings plans, Ippolito argues that these plans can help firms select and pay their best workers without expending monitoring resources. Building on his proposals for managing private pension plans, Ippolito concludes with a blueprint for fixing the social security system that would promote incentives to work and save while at the same time improving the system's financial condition.
 

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Contents

Chapter
3
FIGURES
7
Chapter
10
Chapter Three
18
TABLES
21
Chapter Four
30
Chapter Five
41
Chapter
61
Chapter
129
Chapter Eleven
140
Chapter Twelve
157
PART THREE
171
Chapter Fourteen
181
Chapter Fifteen
194
Notes
207
Selected References
251

Chapter Seven
79
Chapter Eight
94
Chapter Nine
107

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 245 - Richard A. Musgrave and Peggy B. Musgrave, Public Finance in Theory and Practice (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1973), pp.
Page 245 - US Social Security Administration, Annual Statistical Supplement to the Social Security Bulletin.

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