Penthouse living

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Wiley-Academy, Feb 22, 2005 - Architecture - 216 pages
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The penthouse is perhaps the most iconic of all living spaces. The word implies wealth, with an emphasis on space, views, and an enviable urban lifestyle. But when did our domestic aspirations start to look skyward? Is the contemporary penthouse a purely elitist space, or are there mass-market solutions that might open up the roofscapes to everyone? Penthouses are aspirational, conjuring up a life with an undeniably sexual edge – Playboy magazine even developed its own penthouse concept for an early issue. They also imply a sense of mystery and power, these are the homes of industrialists, media moguls and film stars, elevated high above the rest of humanity.

Penthouse Living presents a selection of architecturally adventurous and dramatic penthouse projects from around the world, including modernist icons, cinematic visions and futuristic concepts, as well as a history of the penthouse, recent projects and tomorrow's icons. Penthouse Living will open the door to just a few of these exclusive spaces, an in-depth look at the developing architectural response to living on high.

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Contents

Introduction
88
Mica House Penthouse Stanton Williams Architects
96
Penthouse in Manhattan
106
Copyright

12 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

Jonathan Bell is a writer and freelance journalist. His books include 'Carchitecture' (August, 2001), 'The Transformable House' (Architectural Design, 2000) and ‘Concept Cars’ (RotoVision, 2003). He writes regularly for Blueprint, Wallpaper and Grafik, and is also the co-editor of things, a journal of writing about objects and their histories. He is married and lives in London.

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