People and Computers XIX - The Bigger Picture: Proceedings of HCI 2005

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Tom McEwan, Jan Gulliksen, David Benyon
Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 20, 2007 - Computers - 510 pages
As a new medium for questionnaire delivery, the Internet has the potential to revolutionize the survey process. Online (Web-based) questionnaires provide several advantages over traditional survey methods in terms of cost, speed, appearance, flexibility, functionality, and usability [Bandilla et al. 2003; Dillman 2000; Kwak & Radler 2002]. Online-questionnaires can provide many capabilities not found in traditional paper-based questionnaires: they can include pop-up instructions and error messages; they can incorporate links; and it is possible to encode difficult skip patterns making such patterns virtually invisible to respondents. Despite this, and the emergence of numerous tools to support online-questionnaire creation, current electronic survey design typically replicates the look-and-feel of pap- based questionnaires, thus failing to harness the full power of the electronic survey medium. A recent environmental scan of online-questionnaire design tools found that little, if any, support is incorporated within these tools to guide questionnaire design according to best-practice [Lumsden & Morgan 2005]. This paper briefly introduces a comprehensive set of guidelines for the design of online-questionnaires. It then focuses on an informal observational study that has been conducted as an initial assessment of the value of the set of guidelines as a practical reference guide during online-questionnaire design. 2 Background Online-questionnaires are often criticized in terms of their vulnerability to the four standard survey error types: namely, coverage, non-response, sampling, and measurement errors.
 

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Contents

III
3
IV
19
V
37
VI
53
VII
69
VIII
84
IX
101
X
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XI
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XVI
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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Page 17 - Koschmann, R. Hall & N. Miyake (eds.), CSCL 2: Carrying Forward the Conversation, Computers, Cognition & Work, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp.303-16.

About the author (2007)

David Benyon is Professor of Human-Computer Systems at Napier University.

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