Percival Keene

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BiblioBazaar, 2008 - Fiction - 420 pages
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This scarce antiquarian book is included in our special Legacy Reprint Series. In the interest of creating a more extensive selection of rare historical book reprints, we have chosen to reproduce this title even though it may possibly have occasional imperfections such as missing and blurred pages, missing text, poor pictures, markings, dark backgrounds and other reproduction issues beyond our control. Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as a part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world's literature.

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Percival Keene

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Another volume in Holt's ongoing "Heart of the Oak Sea Classics" series, this 1842 novel follows the title character through many adventures on the high seas. LJ reviewer Louis J. Parascandola edited this volume and wrote the introduction. Read full review

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About the author (2008)

A master of the sea tale, Marryat wrote novels that deal with life in the English Navy, in which he himself served. His stories were written for children but were read by old and young alike. "Masterman Ready" (1841) at one time stood next to "Robinson Crusoe" in popularity with boy readers. "Peter Simple" (1834) is the most autobiographical of the novels, "Mr. Midshipman Easy" (1836), the most humorous. "Percival Keene" (1842), the least estimable of his heroes, is a melodramatic story. "The Little Savage" (1848) is a horror tale of remarkable power, strong in plot and character development. Marryat's novels are all didactic, but his moral lessons never intrude or offend. The details of his adventurous life, so far as they are known, are well described in Oliver Warner's "Captain Marryat: A Rediscovery." "A Diary in America" appeared first in 1839. The recognition now given to Marryat as a source for social history is fully deserved, since his opinionated account of his journey gives us "an invaluable view of American life at the time when Jacksonian democracy was in full development in the new nation.

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