Performing Americanness: Race, Class, and Gender in Modern African-American and Jewish-American Literature

Front Cover
UPNE, 2008 - Literary Criticism - 180 pages
0 Reviews
In Performing Americanness, Catherine Rottenberg raises important questions about what it means to be American through a wholly original analysis of modern African-American and Jewish-American literature. The book illustrates how the novels of Nella Larsen, James Weldon Johnson, Anzia Yezierska, and Abraham Cahan help us to understand the specific ways that gender, class, race, and ethnicity have regulated the identity formation of African and Jewish Americans, as well as the ways these categories have helped produce and sustain social stratification in the United States more generally. Through the author's comparative lens, new light is shed on fundamental internal and external conflicts--especially of identity--that took place as both groups sought to move from margin to center by carving out a niche for themselves in mainstream American society.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter
9
Performativity in Context
16
Chapter
33
Chapter Three
53
Chapter Four
70
Chapter Five
92
Chapter
108
Epilogue
130
Bibliography I
161
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Currently a fellow at the University of Michigan's Frankel Institute, CATHERINE ROTTENBERG will be an assistant professor in the Foreign Languages and Linguistics and Communications Departments at Ben-Gurion University in Beer Sheva, Israel, beginning in 2008.

Bibliographic information