Performing Greek Comedy

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Cambridge University Press, 2012 - Drama - 311 pages
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Alan Hughes presents a new complete account of production methods in Greek comedy. The book summarises contemporary research and disputes, on such topics as acting techniques, theatre buildings, masks and costumes, music and the chorus. Evidence is re-interpreted and traditional doctrine overthrown. Comedy is presented as the pan-Hellenic, visual art of theatre, not as Athenian literature. Recent discoveries in visual evidence are used to stimulate significant historical revisions. The author has directly examined 350 vase scenes of comedy in performance and actor-figurines, in 75 collections, from Melbourne to St Petersburg. Their testimony is applied to acting techniques and costumes, and women's participation in comedy and mime. The chapters are arranged by topic, for convenient reference by scholars and students of theatre history, literature, classics and drama. Overall, the book provides a fresh practical insight into this continually developing subject.
 

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Contents

chapter 1 Comedy in art Athens and abroad
1
chapter 2 Poets of Old and Middle Comedy
17
chapter 3 Theatres
59
chapter 4 The comic chorus
81
chapter 5 Music in comedy
95
chapter 6 Acting from lyric to dual consciousness
106
chapter 7 Technique and style of acting comedy
146
chapter 8 The masks of comedy
166
chapter 10 Comedy and women
201
chapter 11 New Comedy
215
Catalogue of objects discussed
232
Notes
248
Glossary
287
Bibliography
292
Index
309
Copyright

chapter 9 Costumes of Old and Middle Comedy
178

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About the author (2012)

Alan Hughes is Professor Emeritus, University of Victoria, a theatre historian and professional who has operated his own repertory company. Published research includes Henry Irving, Shakespearean, an account of the actor-manager's productions, and his edition of Titus Andronicus in the New Cambridge Shakespeare series. In 2006 the T. B. L. Webster Fellowship recognised his contributions to the archaeology of Greek theatre, leading to the completion of Performing Greek Comedy.

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