Performing Place, Practising Memories: Aboriginal Australians, Hippies and the State

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Berghahn Books, Sep 30, 2012 - Social Science - 288 pages
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During the 1970s a wave of 'counter-culture' people moved into rural communities in many parts of Australia. This study focuses in particular on the town of Kuranda in North Queensland and the relationship between the settlers and the local Aboriginal population, concentrating on a number of linked social dramas that portrayed the use of both public and private space. Through their public performances and in their everyday spatial encounters, these people resisted the bureaucratic state but, in the process, they also contributed to the cultivation and propagation of state effects.

 

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Contents

Fieldwork and Framework
1
The Mutilation of Memory
30
Hippies Hairies and Enacted Utopia
76
Amphitheatre Dreams
111
The Metamorphosis of the Markets
140
Main Street Blues
159
Cultural Renaissance and Tjapukai Theatre
181
Environmentalists Aboriginal People and the Skyrail
217
The Production of a Space for Difference
239
References
250
Index
266
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About the author (2012)

Rosita Henry is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and a Fellow of the Cairns Institute, James Cook University, Australia. She is coeditor of The Challenge of Indigenous Peoples: Spectacle or Politics? (2011) and author of numerous articles on the political anthropology of place and performance.

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