Peril

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1884
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Page 63 - "I think he is a very clever, good-hearted lad, who will make a fine man when he has had time to learn his lesson a little." " A lad — and what lesson ? " she asked. There was indignant expostulation in the way in which she said
Page 70 - ... a certain amount of sympathy with him on points whose very nature would have been a mystery to Peril, whose angry, disappointed girlhood saw only the personal injury — so he thought just now — and was blind to the possible existence of another side to the case. He thought of the old man — ill and weak, languishing in enforced inactivity ; impotent to meddle more in the concerns which were dearest to him, and he thought Peril's judgment a harsh one. " I thought Hankinson, the manager, had...
Page 246 - ... might pour raw brandy by tumblerfuls down the throat of a man fainting from loss of blood. The words which seemed to her so awful that she shook as she uttered them, produced no startling effect upon him, and it began at last dimly to dawn upon her mind that there was something behind it all — some hidden cause for this strange behaviour ; he had a secret reason pressing upon his mind, which made him impervious to the usual arguments of reason and common-sense. As he only shook his head and...
Page 297 - Well, I was going to call upon Miss Hankinson to-night ; I haven't time now, but I'll send her a note and ask her to take you." " Yon -will do no such thing, " waa the reply, with a sudden access of anger and sharpness in her tones. " Do you suppose I have any desire to foist myself upon people who don't want me ? Why should Miss Hankinson be bothered with me ? She has very likely got engagements of her own. Send the tickets back, or give them to some one else, and I'll stay at home.
Page 87 - ... good woman, might have seen more of Peril's wilfulness, hardness, sullenness, and revengefulness than of the other side of the question ; the present writer has heard a woman, good-hearted, clever, in a position of high rank in the educational world, say that there was one rule on which she invariably acted, and that was that when any girl came to a rupture with her relations, or failed to get on with her family, it was invariably the girl's own fault. This is a rule which would doubtless smooth...
Page 15 - ... something about the lad that I can't help liking, and his earnestness amuses me. He was nearly as serious about this, as he is about the innate right of a nation to manhood suffrage. And I knew it was perfectly true that he would have asked me long ago if he could. And — let me be honest — the word 'dinner ' had awakened hopes and desires long dormant, and as I had hoped, dead. " I waved aside all apologies, so as to put him at his ease, and said : " ' My dear Nowell, make no excuses. We...
Page 146 - ... married life must have undeceived her, and very plainly discovered to her that there was no rough outside crust, with love, and passion, and romance beneath ; it was all hewn out of the same piece, and that piece was granite. She never let him know, if she did undergo this disillusion. As years went on, and they went to the more ambitious house in Great North Street, she wore her silks and satins, and the massive, ungainly jewellery with which he presented her from time to time (never without...
Page 67 - ... I should think so," said Paul sympathetically. "But you have friends, I dare say, like Hugh, whom you can go to see ? " " Not one," was the bitter, cold reply. " All the people they know are like those you saw the other night — delightful people to have for friends, don't you think ? Mrs. Eoper told me she would be charmed if I would go and see her, and the inducement she offered was that we could do crewel-work together." "Bah!" said Lawford. " Fancy how richly I should have felt rewarded,...
Page 83 - ... futile," he interrupted, quite eager to throw his little vial of oil upon the troubled waves. She laughed. " I have never thought about that. I think he would do anything if money came in question. She would like me to be cast out, and that her beloved Hugh might have it all. She would grudge me so much as a hundred a year to keep me from starving. I understood then, that as I had come into the world unwelcome, and had had to live loveless ever since, so here, where I was helpless and a stranger,...
Page 54 - Hugh's," whom nobody asked about, and nobody wanted to see again. He had this conviction very strongly — latent if unexpressed ; and yet, despite this, and despite the fact that he carried a very sensitive spirit under his lazily indifferent exterior, he was sallying forth this afternoon, to make the regulation call : partly because it was the regulation thing to do, and he had no objection to let these uncultivated Nowells know it ; and partly, though he had scarcely owned it even to himself,...

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