Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Principles of Diagnosis

Front Cover
Thieme, 2005 - Medical - 333 pages
Originally published in 1942 and updated in 1953, this edition is packed with everything a physician should know about peripheral nerve injuries. Peripheral Nerve Injuries contains detailed description of the anatomy of the peripheral nervous system and the techniques used to test the various portions of the peripheral nervous system by physical examination. The basics of muscle testing as well as the relationships of the muscles to the nerves are still as utilitarian today. Topics included in Peripheral Nerve Injuries: -General principles of the composition of segmental nerves, plexuses and peripheral nerves -The innervation of skin and muscles by spinal segments -The distribution of peripheral nerves -Innervation of the skeleton, and disorders of bones and joint tissues resulting from nerve injuries -Manifestations of peripheral nerve injuries -An analysis of the movements tested in neurological examination -Classification, causes and symptomatology of peripheral nerve injuries -And much more.
 

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Contents

SECTION I
1
CHAPTER 2
17
THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE PERIPHERAL NERVES
38
CHAPTER 4
47
SECTION II
55
AN ANALYSIS OF THE MOVEMENTS TESTED IN A NEUROLOGI
67
Abdomen
105
MoveMENT AT THE KNEE
111
Ankylosis
184
TESTS EMPLOYED IN THE DIAGNOSIS OR PROGNOSIS OF NERVE
185
SECTION IV
199
CHAPTER 11
209
The Anterior Thoracic Nerves
226
The Subscapular Nerves
234
The Median Nerve
241
The Ulnar Nerve
251

CHAPTER 7
123
Fourth Degree Injury
129
Muscle Atrophy and Motor Irritative Phenomena
136
Spread of Sensory and Motor Deficit after Nerve Injury
143
Pain
151
Peripheral Nerve Injury in Fractures and Dislocations
161
Blood Vessel Injury and Aneurysm Formation
167
Tendon and Muscle Injuries
173
The Medial Cutaneous Nerve of the Arm and of the Forearm and the
262
Combined Radian and Median or Ulnar Palsy
272
The Iliohypogastric Nerve
275
The Femoral Nerve
281
The Sciatic Nerve and Its Branches
287
The Superior and Inferior Gluteal Nerves
306
13
316
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Page 291 - It pierces the deep fascia in the middle third of the back of the leg, and is joined immediately afterwards by the peroneal communicating nerve from the peroneal nerve.
Page 45 - Obturator n. • Lat. cut. n. of calf ('from common peroneal n] '...Superficial peroneal n. (from common peroneal n.) •Sural n. (fromtibialn.) FIGURE 30. The Cutaneous Fields of Peripheral Ncroes from the Anterior Aspect. The numbers on the left side of the trunk refer to the intercostal nerves. On the right side are shown the cutaneous fields of the lateral and medial branches of the anterior primary rami. The asterisk just beneath the scrotum is in the field of the posterior cutaneous nerve of...
Page 321 - BARNES, and LYONS. WR: Peripheral Nerve Injuries. I. The Results of "Early" Nerve Suture: A Preliminary Report.
Page 33 - The spinal cord (see also p. 27) is approximately cylindrical in form and has a length of from 43 to 45 cm. It is continuous with the medulla oblongata of the brain at the foramen magnum and terminates in the tapered conus medullaris at the lower border of the first lumbar vertebra or the upper border of the second.
Page 291 - ... down the back of the leg to the outer side of the foot. At the upper level of the soleus muscle the tibial goes over into the posterior tibial nerve, which, on reaching the sole of the foot, divides into medial and lateral plantar nerves. The common peroneal nerve divides into the superficial peroneal and deep peroneal nerves, both of which ultimately reach the dorsum of the foot.
Page 319 - POLLOCK, LJ, and DAVIS, L.: Peripheral Nerve Injuries, New York, Paul B. Hoeber, Inc., 1932.

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