Personal Identity and Buddhist Philosophy: Empty Persons

Front Cover
Ashgate, 2003 - Philosophy - 231 pages
1 Review
What does it mean to be a person? The philosophical problem of personal identity has been the subject of much debate in both Western philosophy and Buddhist philosophy. This book initiates a conversation between the two traditions showing how concepts and tools drawn from one philosophical tradition can help solve problems arising in another, particularly as regards the philosophical investigation of persons. The recent controversy over personal identity has concerned reductionism, the view that persons are mere useful fictions. Mark Siderits explores the most important objections that have been raised to reductionism, and shows how some key arguments and semantic tools from early Buddhism can be used to answer those objections. Buddhist resources are used to examine the important ethical consequences of this view of persons. The second half of the book explores a new objection to reductionism about persons that originates in Mahayana Buddhist philosophy.

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

What does it mean to be a person? The philosophical problem of personal identity has been the subject of much debate in both Western philosophy and Buddhist philosophy. This book initiates a conversation between the two traditions showing how concepts and tools drawn from one philosophical tradition can help solve problems arising in another, particularly as regards the philosophical investigation of persons.The recent controversy over personal identity has concerned reductionism, the view that persons are mere useful fictions. Mark Siderits explores the most important objections that have been raised to reductionism, and shows how some key arguments and semantic tools from early Buddhism can be used to answer those objections. Buddhist resources are used to examine the important ethical consequences of this view of persons. The second half of the book explores a new objection to reductionism about persons that originates in Mahayana Buddhist philosophy.
each person's existence just consists in the existence of a brain and body, and the occurrence of a series of interrelated physical and mental events. - Page 11
Appears in 20 books from 1964-2007
More details
Personal Identity and Buddhist Philosophy: Empty Persons
By Mark Siderits
Published by Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2003
ISBN 0754634736, 9780754634737
231 pages
 

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

Mark Siderits is Professor of Philosophy at Illinois State University.

Bibliographic information