Personality Type: An Owner's Manual

Front Cover
Shambhala Publications, 1998 - Psychology - 415 pages
2 Reviews
The type test inside will tell you about the choices you've made and the direction you're taking--according to C. G. Jung's theory of psychological types.

For Jung, knowing your type was essential to understanding yourself: a way to measure personal growth and change. But his ideas have been applied largely in the areas of career and marital counseling, so type has come to seem predictive: a way to determine your job skills and social abilities.

This book reclaims type as a way to talk about people's inner potential and the choices they make in order to honor it. Using everyday examples from popular culture--films, "Star Trek," soap operas, comic strips--it describes the sixteen basic ways people come to terms with their gifts and values.

In this book you will find tools to understand:

   *  How your personality takes shape
   *  How your type reflects not only your current priorities, but your hidden potential
   *  How unlived possibilities are trying to get your attention
   *  How relationships at home and at work can help you to tap your unrealized gifts


Whether you're trying to figure out who you are and what you need to do in life, or recognizing that deeper meaning lies beyond what you've already accomplished, this book will help you to become aware of your greatest strengths, your opportunities to live them out, and your ability to make the most of your unique potential.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - maryh10000 - LibraryThing

If you want in-depth analyses of the different type preferences, with Star Trek examples thrown in (ok, not just Star Trek), this is a great book. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kristicw - LibraryThing

This is an excellent handbook for understanding personality types. Easy enough for the lay and deep enough for the professional. Read full review

Contents

This Door Is Not the Door
3
Casting Types
13
Interpreting the Type Evaluator Results
21
Extraversion or Introversion
27
Our Two Strongest Functions
34
Perceiving or Judging
46
Our Dominant and Secondary Functions
56
Personality Types Are Also Brain Types
69
The Perceiving Functions
143
Extraverted SensationESTP and ESFP Types
145
Introverted SensationISTJ and ISFJ Types
169
Extraverted IntuitionENTP and ENFP Types
196
Introverted IntuitionINTJ and INFJ Types
222
The Judging Functions
251
Extraverted ThinkingESTJ and ENTJ Types
253
Introverted ThinkingISTP and INTP Types
286

What Happens to the Functions We Dont Prefer?
75
Type Dynamics
86
The Tertiary Problem
96
Getting Along with Other Types
114
Extraversion and Introversion
123
Extraverted FeelingESFJ and ENFJ Types
317
Introverted FeelingISFP and INFP Types
365
Notes
405
Index
408
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Lenore Thomson, M.Div., has written extensively on theology and psychoanalysis for the past twenty-five years. Formerly managing editor of the Jungian journal Quadrant, she has taught courses on psychological types and popular culture at the C. G. Jung Foundation in New York City.

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