Perspectives on Loss: A Sourcebook

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John H. Harvey
Psychology Press, 1998 - Psychology - 361 pages
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Losses are integral to the human experience, but they sometimes unfold in subtle ways. Loss is not just about death, but can encompass a number of situations, such as those gradual losses experienced by the elderly: loss of vision, mental capacity, or hope.

Intended to stimulate ideas and research in the new area of psychological aspects of loss, this sourcebook collects the writing of a set of distinguished scholars representing psychology and related fields. The author presents a case for a broadly-construed field of loss-both personal and interpersonal-that would complement other fields such as death and dying, traumatology, and stress and coping.

No other volume is as comprehensive in its treatment of this intriguing subject. The book begins with an introduction to the concept of loss and discusses the definition of the term and the salience of the topic in the general public in the 1990s. Contributors were chosen to represent some of the most interesting current work on different types of loss and adaptation in the whole of the social and behavioral sciences. Contents cover such diverse subjects as loss in intimate relationships, disability, chronic illness, genocide, sports, unemployment, and homelessness. The book concludes with a commentary section on loss theory and research.

 

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Contents

New Directions in Loss Research
3
Loss Research at a Crossroads
12
Blockades to Finding Meaning and Control
21
Adopting New Perspectives
27
The Role of Loss in Value
41
Deciding about Abortion
55
A Case for Hope in Pain Loss and Suffering
63
Hopelessness Got Us into This So Can Hope Get Us Out?
71
Confronting Loss
195
Loss Experienced in Chronic Pain and Illness
201
ReStorying Ones Life
207
Unique Aspects of Bereavement
213
Mental Health Professionals Responses to Loss
221
References
228
SelfHealing
234
The Experience of Loss in Sport
241

References
77
Stress Response Syndromes and Grief Manifestations
84
Conclusions
94
Why Relationships End
102
Conclusion
108
Contradictions in Intimate Relationships
113
Contradictory Themes
119
Loss in the Experience of Multiracial Couples
125
The Loss to Whites from Racism
131
A Relationship Perspective
137
Addressing Specific Relationship Challenges
143
A Final Word on Loss
150
The More or Less Passionate Receiver
156
Solutions to Passions Decline
162
Implications of Communal Relationships Theory
173
Loss as a Contributor to Caregiver Depressed Affect
179
A Tapestry of Loss
189
Retirement from Sport
247
Losses Related to Body Weight
253
Psychological Outcomes
259
Conceptual
269
Secondary Loss
275
Conclusion
289
Elana Ceausescu Syndrome
295
References
301
Risk Groups and Event Resolution
310
Why There Must Be a Psychology of Loss
319
The Value of Confronting Loss
325
Can There Be a Psychology of Loss?
331
Meaning Reconstruction
337
Issues in the Study of Loss and Grief
343
Is Grief Work Necessary if People are to Return
349
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About the author (1998)

John H. Harvey is Professor of Psychology at the University of Iowa. Formerly, he taught at Vanderbilt, Ohio State, and Texas Tech Universities and was Educational Affairs Officer at the American Psychological Association (APA) from 1981 to 1982. He is a social psychologist specializing in the study of close relationships, attribution and account making, and loss and trauma phenomena. He is a Fellow of Division 8 of the APA and was a Fulbright Research Fellow studying loss in Romania in the spring of 1998. He has authored and/or edited over 20 books and has published 130 articles and chapters. He was editor of "Contemporary Psychology" from 1992 to 1998 and was founding editor of the "Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology" and the "Journal of Personal and Interpersonal Loss." With Sage, he published the book "Perspectives on Loss and Trauma: Assaults on the Self" in 2002.

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