Peter Parley's Common School History: Illustrated with Engravings

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Marshall, Williams & Butler, 1841 - World history - 407 pages
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Contents

More about Babel 22
22
About the great Assyrian Empire and Reign of Queen Semir amis
23
Queen Setniramis sets forth to conquer the World but is defeated by the King of the Indies
25
About Ninias Reign of Sardanapalus and Ruin of the Assyrian Empire
26
ST Removal of Jacob and his Children to Egypt
28
3XIII The Bondage in Egypt Flight of the Hebrews and Destruction of Pharaoh and his Host
30
About the Wanderings of the Israelites in the Wilderness
33
Overthrow of the Midianites Samson Judge of Israel
36
Samsons Exploits and Death
37
Beginning of the Reign of Saul
39
Combat of David and Goliath
40
The Reign of David Wisdom of Solomon
41
The Building of the Temple Visit of the Queen of Sbeba
43
The Decline of the Jewish Nation
45
The Hebrew Prophets
47
Crucifixion of the Saviour Destruction of Jerusalem
49
Cyrus conquers Babylon His Death
51
Reign of Cambyses
53
Expedition of Xerxes into Greece 4
54
XXVH Affairs of Persia till the Saracen Conquest
58
Early History of China
60
Anecdotes of the Chinese Emperors
62
Cities of China Manners of the Chinese
63
Origin of the Arabs Rise of Mahomet
65
Sequel of the History of the Saracens
67
About Syria Phenicia and Asia Minor
69
A brief View of several Nations
72
Review of the Historv of Asia
74
Chronology of Asia
76
CHAPTER paok XXXVIII About the Geography of Africa The Inhabitants
79
Early Sovereigns of Egypt SI XL Egyptian Architecture and Sculpture
83
The Ptolemies and Queen Cleopatra
87
XL1I Sequel of the Egyptian History
89
Summary of Ethiopian Matters
91
Origin of the Barbary States and their Piracies on the Christians
92
Fables and Facts about Africa
94
History of the SlaveTrade M
95
Chronology of Africa 98
98
About Greece where it is situated Appearance of the Country Climate 102
102
The Extent of Greece First Settlement of the Country
104
The Grecian Lawgivers
106
War with Persia
108
LIH Affairs of Athens
109
Beginning of the Theban War
111
Sequel of the Theban War 112
112
Grecian Religion or Mythology
114
The Grecian Philosophers 118
118
The Grecian Philosophers continued
119
L1X Something more about Philosophers About the Greek Poets
121
About the Mode of Life among the Ancient Greeks
123
Philip of Macedon conquers Greece
125
LX1I Conquests of Alexander the Great
127
Sequel to Alexanders Career 129
129
Greece invaded by the Gauls
131
End of Grecian Independence 132
132
Modern History of Greece
134
About Italy as it now is
135
Founding of Rome by Romulus Its early State
138
LX1X Battle of the Horatii and Curiatll
141
From the Reign of Ancus Martius till the Expulsion of the Kings
143
The Story of Coriolanus
145
Rome invaded by the Gauls The first Punic War
146
Second and third Punic Wars
149
Scipios Triumph
151
Sylla and Marius
152
Cneius Pompey and Julius Csesar
154
Caesar usurps the Supreme Power
155
XXV11I Assassination of Julius Csesar
156
Consequences of Csssars Death
158
About the great Power and Extent of the Roman Empire in the Time of Augustus
159
The Means by which Rome acquired its Power
161
Rome under the Emperors
163
Fall of the Western Empire of the Romans
164
Progress of the Decline of Rome
166
Manners and Customs of the Ancient Romans
168
About Religion Deities Temples Marriage 170
170
About Funeral Rites and Ceremonies
172
Roman Farms Mode of Ploughing Farmhouses Grain Cattle Superstitions of the Farmers Gardens Vines
174
Country Houses Description of Plinys Villa Aqueducts
176
Military Affairs of the Romans Division of the Army The Imperial Eagle Music Arms Dress Military Rewards Crowns The Triumph
179
About Naval Affairs The War Galley Commerce Shorn of Wild Beasts Exhibitions of Gladiators
181
Sports Chariot Racing The Circus Carriages Private En tertainments Supper Rooms Convivial Parties Luxuries
183
XC1II About Theatres Clocks and Watches The Fine Arts Books and Writing Costume Conclusion
185
Rome under the Popes
187
About several other Italian States
190
About the Gauls and other Tribes of Barbarians How the southern Parts of Europe were first settled and how the northern Parts were settled afterwar...
208
Story of the Barbarians continued
209
The Gauls Origin of the French Nation Little King Pepin
212
About Clovis and little King Pepin
214
The Reign of Charlemagne 216
216
About the Crusades or Holy Wars
218
About the Feudal System 221
221
About Chivalry or KnightErrantry
224
More about Chivalry 227
227
King Philip and Pope Boniface Wars of the French and English
229
The Reigns of several French Kings
232
The Reigns of Louis the Grand and his Successor
234
The French Revolution
237
The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte
240
CX1X The Fall of Bonaparte
242
Recent Aflairs of France
244
About Germany
245
About the Ancient Tribes of Germany Charlemagne c
246
Affairs of Switzerland
249
Sequel ofGerman History 241
253
About Hungary Bohemia the Tyrol c
255
About Prussia
257
History of Prussia 258
258
Description of Russia
260
Description of Russia continued
262
The Reign of Peter the Great
264
The Successors of Peter the Great
266
About Sweden
268
Charles the Twelfth and his Successors
270
About Lapland Norway and Denmark
272
Brief Notices of several Kingdoms and States
274
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
276
CXXXVI1I About London and other Cities of England Wales Scotland and Ireland
279
CXXX1X Origin of the British Nation The Druids
281
Saxon and Danish Kings of England
283
CXLl Norman Kings of England
285
English Wars and Rebellions
287
The Lancastrian Kings of England
289
Wars of the Roses
291
CHAPTER TAOS CXLV Reiens of the Tudor Princes
293
The Reign of Elizabeth
295
Accession of the House of Stuart
297
CXLV1I1 Win of the King nd Parliament
299
CXL1X The Protectorate and the Restoration
301
The Revolution of 1688 mid other Matters
303
The Hanoverian Kings of Great Britain
305
The Story of Wales
307
CLIU The Story of Scotland
309
About Ireland 311
311
Matters and Things
314
Review The Dark Ages Important Inventions c
317
CLV1I Chronology of Europe
320
AMERICA
323
CLV1II About America
325
The llrst Inhabitants of America CLX Discovery of America by Columbus
330
A few Words about Iceland and Greenland Settlements of the French in America
332
CLX1I The French Colonies conquered by the English
334
CLX11I Description of the United Slates
336
CLX1V Settlement and Colonial History of New England
338
Affairs of New England continued
340
Early History ofVirginia
341
CLXV1I Braddocks Defeat and other Matters
343
CLXVI1I Causes which led to the Revolution
344
Account of the Battle of Lexington
346
The Battle of Bunker Hill
347
Progress of the War Capture of Burgoyne
348
The Story of the Traitor Arnold and Major Andre
350
CLXX111 War in the South Surrender of Cornwallis
351
CLXX1V Affairs of the United States since the Revolution
353
General Remarks upon the History of the United States
354
General Remarks on the History of the United States continued
355
About South America El Dorado and the Fountain of Youth
358
CLXXVUI History of the Mexican Territories Guatimala
360
Spanish Peruvian Territories
362
Account of the Brazilian Territories Sfi4
364
The West Indies
365
CLXXX1I The West Indies continued CLXXXIII The West Indies continued
369
Chronology of America
371
About Oceania The Malaysian Islands
373
The Australian Division of Oceania
374
Polynesia The Sandwich Islands
376
CLXXXVII1 Polynesia continued The Society Islands
377
Story of the Bounty concluded
379
Chronology of Oceania
381
367
395

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Page 188 - In 1077 Pope Gregory obliged Henry IV., emperor of Germany, to stand three days, in the depth of winter, barefooted at his castle gate, to implore his pardon. In...
Page 60 - It is bounded on the north by Asiatic Russia, on the east by the Pacific Ocean, and on the south by the Chinese Sea and Farther India. On the west there are mountains and sandy deserts, which divide it from Thibet and Tartary.
Page 181 - The merchant ships of the Romans were of a size corresponding with the purposes for which they were intended. Before the discovery of the magnet, by which the mariner can now direct his course in safety over the pathless waves, navigation was necessarily confined to the coast. These coasting vessels were considered large if they reached the burden of fifty tons; 4.
Page 80 - The immense desert of Sahara, with all the adjacent regions, appears to be occupied by wandering tribes of Arabs, who move from place to place with their horses and camels, like the people of Arabia, for pasturage or plunder. 7. Africa may be considered as, on the •whole, the least civilized portion of the earth. The people are mostly Mahometans, and one half of them are nearly in a savage state. The rest are in a barbarous condition. 8. The central parts of Africa abound in wild animals, such...
Page 184 - The horses were yoked to the carriage by means of a curved cross-bar passing over their necks, and were directed by bridles and reins, which were sometimes of embroidered silk, with gold bits. 7. Besides mules and horses, many other animals were occasionally used in carriages, such as dogs, goats, and deer, and even bears, leopards, lions, and tigers. But this, of course, was merely for a whimsical amusement, and not fur real service.
Page 179 - The uniform of the generals was an open scarlet mantle. 6. The cavalry wore a coat of mail, of brazen or steel scales, or of chain-work, sometimes plated with gold. Under this they wore a close garment which reached to their buskins. They rode without stirrups, and their saddles were merely cloths folded to suit the convenience of the rider. The discipline of the army was maintained with great strictness and severity. 7. Rewards of various kinds were held out to those who distinguished themselves...
Page 75 - Europe, there is a constant improvement. Every year brings some new art, invention, or institution for the benefit of society. 11. But in Asia it is not so. Whoever is king, the people are but slaves. Education makes...
Page 224 - In return for these services the lord of the manor, or owner of the land, was expected to protect his people in time of war; and as the castle was usually large and strong, the people fled to it whenever an enemy appeared in sight.
Page 307 - His biographer has been able to identify a single phrase as our author's. He is speaking of George IV: 'Even when he was quite a young man, this King cared as much about dress as any young coxcomb. He had a great deal of taste in such matters, and it is a pity that he was a King, for he might otherwise have made an excellent tailor.
Page 242 - BONAPARTE. 1. IN 1802, Bonaparte was elected consul of the French Republic for life. Two years afterwards he was proclaimed emperor, by the name of Napoleon. He had now more power than any of the ancient kings. 2. I cannot follow this great captain in his marches all over Europe, nor even number the victories which he won. "Wherever he went, monarchs humbled themselves before G$ him. He drove them from their thrones, and placed his own brothers and chief officers there instead.

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